War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0240 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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force I was obliged to fall back to my original lines, which I did at 9 p.m. The length of time consumed in the advance of my right gave ample time for the concentration of force, if they had any. I have one prisoner only reported to me, who states he is from the Twenty-fifth Virginia Battalion, and he states part of the picket was from the Third North Carolina. My cavalry advanced on my left to some 200 yards beyond the Ammons house, and report rebel infantry force in the woods near that point, but I should suppose not to exceed two or three companies. They advanced in a line nearly perpendicular to my line of vedettes, fired rapidly in skirmish five to ten minutes, then fired a volley and retired. As they retired my left vedette fired at the left of this force. At what they were firing my vedettes could not state. I have some wounded, but I believe none killed.

WM. B. WOOSTER,

Colonel Twenty-ninth Connecticut.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, August 16, 1864.

General HUMPHREYS:

Am I expected to resume work on the redoubts in my front?

E. O. C. ORD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, August 16, 1864-3 p.m.

Major-General ORD,

Commanding Eighteenth Corps:

If you have men that you can put to work upon the redoubts the commanding general thinks the work should be resumed.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, Va., August 16, 1864.

Brigadier General J. B. CARR,

Commanding First Division, Eighteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I am instructed by Major-General Ord to direct you to take measures to have the trenches in your front properly drained, and every necessary precaution taken to guard against their being filled with water in the future. You will also repair at once all damages which the parapets have sustained by reason of the rain. If pails are needed for bailing the trenches, or tools are needed, they can be had on application to these headquarters. As there are 2,000 picks and spades reported as being in the trenches, it is presumed they are not needed.

I am, general, very respectfully, yours,

THEODORE READ,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Same to Brigadier Gens. A. Ames and C. J. Paine.)