War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0193 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 14, 1864-10.25 p. m.

Major-General ORD,

Commanding Eighteenth Corps:

The commanding general prefers the Fifth Corps to have its own batteries, and they can probably be got out without attracting notice. It is understood that the artillery of the Ninth Corps that will probably be removed can also be taken out without being observed.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

August 14, 1864.

Brigadier General J. B. CARR:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the major-general commanding to say that in case it should rain severely, and the ravine in which our troops are encamped should become too wet for occupancy, you will remove them above the railroad bridge to the position now occupied by some of the troops of General Ames, who has been directed to make room for you.

Very respectfully,

THEODORE READ,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 14, 1864-12.20 a. m.

Brigadier-General KAUTZ,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

The commanding general has telegraphed General Butler to send back your regiment near Powhatan, and has requested Lieutenant-General Grant to have the cattle herd drawn in nearer to City Point. You must make the best disposition you can of your force, keeping it as much concentrated as possible. You may have to move to-morrow. The enemy have but one division of cavalry on this side the Appomattox.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

CITY POINT, VA., August 15, 1864-9 p. m.

(Received 6.30 a. m. 17th.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.

If there is any danger of an uprising in the North to resist the draft or for any other purpose our loyal Governors ought to organize the militia at once to resist it. If we are to draw troops from the field to keep the loyal States in harness it will prove difficult to suppress the rebellion in the disloyal States. My withdraw now from the James River would insure the defeat of Sherman. Twenty thousand men sent to him at this time would destroy the greater part of Hood's

13 R R-VOL XLII, PT II