War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0124 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

Search Civil War Official Records

get it if we do not. Then the whisky will do our enemies no good. It will do them more harm, and for my part I would not care how much they had, if we could get sinews of war in exchange for it. It is no use for us to send raiding parties for this cotton or to send agents to purchase it with our money; thus would is to procure this cotton is worthy of his hire, and that he is willing to leave to you or to me if his proposition be accepted. It is my impression that the one-tenth of all cotton so procured ought to be a sufficient reward. I beg as early reply to this, and if the plan seems a good one I beg that the commissary of subsistence at New York be directed to send at once to the commissary department here 100 barrels of common whisky; 900 more if I direct a requisition for that amount to be made on him, and still another 900 if the venture should prove a success.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 12, 1864 - 11 a. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Send orders to Major-General Hancock to move his command as soon as practicable to City Point. His artillery and trains to be sent tonight, or at such time as not to be seen by the enemy, to the vicinity of the Point of Rocks bridge, cross the same and move over to some point in rear of the center of General Butler's line and out of sight of the enemy. Send orders to Gregg to make the necessary arrangements to relieve his division by Kautz's command to-night, Kautz to protect our left and rear and watch over to the James. Gregg, with his division, to move to-morrow to Point of Rocks, at such time as his movement will be concealed from the enemy, cross the bridge, and move to Deep Bottom and across the James, reporting to Hancock. Be particular in notifying all officers that the orders are confidential, and every effort must be made to conceal the destination of the several corps from their own troops as well as the enemy. The idea will be held out that the Ninth Corps is going to Washington.

[MEADE.]

JORDAN'S HOUSE, August 12, 1864 - 1 p. m.

Major FISHER:

A large wagon train moving west, apparently from Butler's front, has just passed open space about six miles northwest from this point. Enemy's signal officers report one regiment of cavalry crossing pontoon to Prince George side, also unusual number of gun-boats and steamers above pontoon.

T. R. CLARK,

Captain and Signal Officer.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS,

August 12, 1864.

Major FISHER:

A column of the enemy's cavalry, followed by thirty-eight wagons,

has just passed a point on the Richmond turnpike north 40 degrees