War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0121 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

August 11, 1864.

Colonel J. W. SHAFFER,

Chief of Staff:

COLONEL: The signal officer at Water Battery reports at 4.25 p. m. that "the enemy have thrown up works to the north and east of Cox's Mill to-day."

Very respectfully, &c.,

L. B. NORTON,

Captain and Chief Signal Officer.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., August 11, 1864.

Brigadier-General RAMSAY,

Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army,

Winder's Building, Washington, D. C.:

I have sixteen Coehorns in position and could fire 1,000 rounds daily to advantage. My supply of this ammunition is nearly exhausted, although it has been economized to our serious detriment, the rebel mortar fire now exceeding our own. In response to my letter of 15th instant and telegram of 19th instant, I have only received about 1,700 rounds. If possible I urgently request a prompt filling of the requisitions for 20,000 rounds, with preparations for a further supply if called for.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding Siege Train.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, TENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, August 11, 1864 - 5.25 a. m.

Colonel CURTIS,

Commanding Brigade:

COLONEL: Your troops will not be kept under arms any longer, as the "emergency is passed." They will be returned to their camps.

By order of Brigadier-General Turner:

ISRAEL R. SEALY,

Captain, Forty-seventh New York Vols., Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, THIRD DIV., TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Pocahontas, Va., August 11, 1864.

Major-General BUTLER:

On the 9th of August, at 2.30 p. m., I received the following dispatch from Colonel Innis, commanding at Fort Powhatan:

A white niggler has just reported to me that there are three companies of cavalry within three miles of this fort; also a large infantry force on the Surry Court-House road. He says 3,000 - I think the 400 or 500 I spoke to you about yesterday. I sent out thirty or forty cavalry to repair the telegraph line this a. m., but they were driven in. What shall I do?

At 3 p. m. I sent the following to Colonel Innis:

Keep a sharp lookout, but don't risk surprise or capture.

Deeming it important to destroy or capture the rebel force that was interrupting the telegraph at 3.45 p. m. I telegraphed to Captain Pit-