War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0111 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS,

August 10, 1864 - 10.20 p. m.

Brigadier-General MARSTON,

Fort Pocahontas:

I desired Colonel Innis to co-operate with General Graham in a movement upon the enemy near Cabin Point and to pursue them down to Swan Point. Graham landed at daybreak. You stopped the march of Colonel Innis until 10.45 by saying, "Don't move until I come. I will be there in an hour." Do you not get up to make movements until 10.45? It is a little later in the morning than I am accustomed to see my officers move. Please explain.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

FORT POWHATAN, August 10, 1864.

(Received 6.40 p. m.)

Major-General BUTLER:

Landed 140 men under Major Von Schilling and my aide, Lieutenant Benson, and marched one mile beyond Cabin Point and returned without meeting with any opposition.

CHAS. K. GRAHAM,

Brigadier-General.

CITY POINT, August 11, 1864.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I think it but a just reward for services already rendered that General Sherman be now appointed a major-general, W. S. Hancock and Sheridan brigadiers in the Regular Army. There are three vacancies for major-generals and one for brigadier-general and Sherman's promotion would make the second. All these officers have proven their worthiness for this advancement. I would also recommend the promotion of Brigadier-General Mower to fill the vacant volunteer major-generalship that would thus be created.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CONFIDENTIAL.] WASHINGTON, August 11, 1864.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

GENERAL: Some forty-odd regiments of Ohio 110-days' men are to be mustered out before the end of the month. The term of service of a number of regiments from Indiana and other States expires this month and the early part of next. To meet this loss of troops there is scarcely nothing coming in under the Presedent's call and I fear you will be obliged to send troops from the field to guard certain places, as West Virginia, the prison camps, &c., which cannot be left without garrisons. There is another very serious matter for which we must be prepared. Pretty strong evidence is accumulating that there is a combination formed or forming to make a forcible resistance to the draft in New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Kentucky, and perhaps some other States. The draft must be enforced, for otherwise the army cannot be