War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0032 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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and supported Colonel Thomas. The question was referred to the provost-marshal at General Beauregard's headquarters, and the arguments of both parties (which had been committed to writing) were laid before him. The decision was reached that Colonel Thomas should be returned. This was done just before daylight on the morning of the 2nd. Neither in going or returning did he have any opportunity of seeing the enemy's lines or camps, of judging of their strength or the disposition of their forces, nor did he hear any conversation or remarks giving any information of importance. His place of confinement, after leaving General Johnson's hands, was in a wretched prison-low, filthy, and almost without ventilation. His treatment by General Johnson (though known to be an officer of colored troops) was civil and even kind; by other officers it was less considerate. At General Johnson's headquarters he was informed that but 36 of the colored troops were taken prisoners; they, as he himself witnessed, were not treated as prisoners of war, but employed at policing of headquarters and similar duties. It was intimated, though by no responsible party, that many of the blacks had been killed after surrender; that their slaughter was stopped by General Mahone.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. G. LORING,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Inspector-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS, Before Petersburg, Va., August 3, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Ninth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report everything in my front exceedingly quiet during the past twelve hours. About 2 p. m. my officer of the day reported picket-firing entirely ceased, and numbers of white flags were displayed by our men and the enemy also. He states that this was owing to an impression upon their part that we had some communication to make with them.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. LEDLIE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS, Before Petersburg, Va., August 3, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Ninth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report everything quiet on my front, with no movement on the part of the enemy observed. The line occupied by my command is being strengthened. Orders have been given to render the abatis in front of the whole line strong and effective.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT B. POTTER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.