War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0964 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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Numbers 16. - Lieutenant Irvin Fulford, Tenth North Carolina Regiment (First North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 17. - Captain James L. McCormic, First North Carolina Artillery Battalion.

Numbers 18. - Lieutenant George D. Parker, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Regiment (Second North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 19. - Lieutenant Edward L. Faison, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Regiment (Second North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 20. - Lieutenant Daniel R. Perry, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Regiment (Second North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 21. - Captain Oliver H. Powell, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Regiment (Second North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 22. - Captain Samuel B. Hunter, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Regiment (Second North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 23. - Captain Daniel Patterson, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Regiment (Second North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 24. - Captain William F. Brooks, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Regiment (Second North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 25. - Captain John M. Sutton, Third North Carolina Artillery Battalion.

Numbers 26. - Captain Zachariah T. Adams, Thirteenth North Carolina Artillery Battalion.

Numbers 27. - Lieutenant F. M. Roby, C. S. Navy.

Numbers 28. - Brigadier General William W. Kirkland, C. S. Army, commanding brigade.

Numbers 29. - Lieutenant Colonel John P. W. Read, C. S. Artillery, commanding Light Artillery.

Numbers 30. - Captain Thomas J. Southerland, Tenth North Carolina Regiment (First North Carolina Artillery).

Numbers 31. - Lieutenant F. M. Hamlin, Fourth Battalion North Carolina Junior Reserves.

Numbers 1. Reports of Major General Benjamin F. Butler, U. S. Army, commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina.

OFF BEAUFORT, N. C.,

December 20, 1864 - 10.30 a. m.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that the troops under the command of Major-General Weitzel left Fortress Monroe, as I informed you, on Wednesday, the 14th, and got off Cape Henry at 4 p. m., and arrived the next afternoon at the place of rendezvous designated by Rear-Admiral Porter. Admiral Porter left with the naval squadron the day previously and as soon as possible after the storm. Fearing lest the enemy might be informed of our movements and guess our destination I sent the transport fleet up the Potomac as far as Mathias Point, about fifty miles, in the daytime, so timing the sailing that they should arrive there after dark, and then during the night retraced their course and get off the Eastern Shore, near Cape Charles, by daylight. This was cleverly done. The enemy's scouts on the Northern Neck, where, I see by the Richmond papers, they watch the movement of troops on the Potomac, saw the fleet go up but did not see it return, so that when I left it was reported in Norfolk that the fleet had gone up the Potomac.

We were exceedingly fortunate in our weather, and lay off New Inlet Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, in very smooth water and pleasant weather. The admiral arrived on Sunday evening from Beaufort, having been detained there from Wednesday night, for reasons presumed to be satisfactory. Sunday night the wind freshened so that it would be impossible to land troops on the outside near Fort Fisher. The admiral was desirous to explode the torpedo vessel that night at 10 o'clock and attack the next