War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0739 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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and throw forward skirmishers to connect with those of the Second Brigade on the left and the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts, of our brigade, on the right. We were ordered forward as soon as the formation was completed, and, pushing through a dense growth of small pines, entered a deep ravine. As our line was formed nearly at right angles to the line of the Second Brigade, we soon lost all connection on the left. Captain Campbell, commanding the skirmishers on that flank drove the enemy from his first rifle-pits, capturing several prisoners; at the same time reporting that he formed no connection on his left and could advanced no farther without being flanked by the enemy. I immediately sent Company I, Captain White, to deploy on his left and try to make a connection with the Second Brigade; at the same time sending word to General Foster that we had lost all connection on our left. Soon after Colonel Dandy reported to me that his regiment was formed in echelon on my left, and prepared to protect my flank; and that General Foster desired me to push the enemy from his next line of pit. I immediately ordered a charge and the whole command moved forward at a run, driving the enemy from a second line of pits, with considerable loss, taking about 40 prisoners, the Twenty-fourth again charging with us. Our rapid movement forward separated us so far from Colonel Dandy's regiment that the enemy got in the rear of our skirmishers on the left and took three of them prisoners. This compelled me to swing back the company of skirmishers on the extreme left of the line until the arrival of Colonel Dandy, when they again advanced. Colonel Dandy taking position on our left, we again pushed forward until we reached another deep ravine, the sides of which were so steep as to be almost impassable; the enemy being strongly intrenched on the opposite crest. Our lines had now become so weak, by constantly extending to the left to prevent being flanked, that for several hundred yards we had only a weak line of skirmishers with very little support, but in spite of all this the enemy outflanked us, and still held a strong position near the mill-pond, from which they opened a severe fire as often as we attempted to carry the opposite crest of the ravine, their shots crossing our line diagonally from our left and rear. At the same time we were subjected to a sharp fire in front. I sent back several messengers, asking that a force might be sent in there to carry the position while we attempted to carry the opposite crest of the ravine, their shots crossing our line diagonally from our left and rear. At the same time we were subjected to a sharp fire in front. I sent back several messengers, asking that a force might be sent in there to carry the position while we attempted to carry the one in front, but for some reason none was sent. The skirmishers of my regiment (six companies) had now been along time engaged, and being entirely out of ammunition I was compelled to relieve them with the four remaining companies relieved to fix bayonets and lie down in rear of the skirmishers. Soon after my skirmishers were all relieved by the First Maryland Cavalry, and the four companies which had not expended their ammunition were sent to the support of Captain Gardner, commanding Twenty-fourth Massachusetts, who has also very much weakened his own line by extending it to the left to keep up his connection with us, as we extended our line in that direction. I had now procured ammunition and was again advancing to the ravine, when the Maryland cavalry broke to the rear at a run. by order of General Foster, I placed Captain Engles with one company deployed as skirmishers on the edge of the ravine to keep the enemy in check, and formed the other five companies in line to allow the maryland regiment to rally in our rear. This was soon accomplished and we were again advancing when General Foster received information that our forces were falling back from the captured works on our right. We therefore remained in position, sub-