War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0425 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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The officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates all behaved in their usual good manner, both on the march and in action.

Respectfully submitted.

J. W. RODER,

Second Lieutenant, Fourth U. S. Artillery, Commanding Battery K.

Major J. G. HAZARD,

Chief of Artillery, Second Army. Corps.

HEADQUARTERS BATTERY K, FOURTH U. S. ARTILLERY,

Before Petersburg, Va., October 31, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with instructions from headquarters Artillery Brigade, Second Corps, of this date, I have the honor to submit the following report of the participation of Battery k, Fourth U. S. Artillery, in the recent movement:

In accordance with instructions from headquarters Artillery Brigade, Second Corps, I reported with my battery to General Mott, commanding Third Division, Second Corps, at 1 p. m. the 26th instant. Was directed by him to follow the division as soon as it moved out. Marched railroad near Yellow Tavern. Left camp at 3 a. m. the 27th; continued to march with the division, arrived on Hatcher's farm, near the Boydton road, about 12m.; was directed by one of General Mott's aides-de-camp to park my battery in the field, where General Hancock had his headquarters. Here I remained until about 3 p. m., when the enemy made a vigorous attack near that part of the line where I was and compelled some of our troops to fall back. I was then directed by Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan, chief of staff to the major-general commanding, to move my battery a short distance to the front and open fire at once, which I did with solid shot and shell, and with good effect. The enemy was at this time not more that about 500 yards from the battery in front, and they were throwing shot and shell in both my flank and rear. As soon as our infantry rallied and the enemy back again I ceased firing. Remained in position until dark, when Lieutenant Smith was ordered to take command of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery, as all the officers in that battery had been wounded, and I was directed by Lieutenant Bull, aide-de-camp to the chief of artillery to report to General Egan, commanding Second Division, Second Corps; was instructed by him to follow the Third Brigade of his division. Left the battle-ground about 9 p. m.; arrived at Hatcher's (or Nobel) Run about 2 a. m. and went into and remained there until daylight, when I crossed the run and marched with the division back to my old camp near Fort Bross.

My casualties are comparatively small, considering the amount of shelling the battery was exposed to. They are as follows: 1 man and 2 horses killed and 3 men and 2 horses wounded; had 6 bags of grain shot off the caissons.

Lieutenant Smith and all the non-commissioned officers and privates behaved in their usual gallant manner. For their able support and good conduct on the march I avail myself of this opportunity to tender them my sincere thanks.

J. W. RODER,

Second Lieutenant, Fourth U. S. Artillery. Commanding Battery K.

Major J. G. HAZARD,

Chief of Artillery, Second Corps.