War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0349 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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I would call the attention of the major-general commanding to report of Brigadier-General Pierce, where it speaks of the bravery displayed by Sergt. Alonzo Woodruff and Corpl. John M. Howard, First U. S. Sharpshooters. Such conduct deserves particular mention.

Major Rivers, Eleventh Massachusetts Volunteers, division officer of the day, rendered me great assistance in forming skirmish lines and gallant conduct in all parts of the field.

All the officers of my staff rendered me efficient service by their promptness in carrying orders, and were conspicuous for their bravery and gallantry during the entire action. Two of them (Captain Bell, judge-advocate, and Lieutenant Lockwood, acting aide-de-camp) were seriously wounded (the former, I fear, fatally) while nobly performing their duties.

The casualties in my division during the action were 5 commissioned officers killed and 28 wounded, 49 enlisted men killed and 338 wounded, 3 commissioned officers and 3242 enlisted men missing; aggregate, 665.*

I forward brigade commanders reports.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. MOTT,

Brevet Major-General.

Major S. CARNCROSS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Army Corps.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS, November 1, 1864.

MAJOR: In compliance with instructions from headquarters Second Army Corps, of the 31st ultimo, I have the honor to report that the One hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers lost three stand of colors during the action of the 27th ultimo (two national and one State color), under the following circumstances: As the skirmishing commenced in the woods to the right of the open field near the Boydton plank road, I ordered General Pierce, commanding brigade, to send some troops to the support of the skirmish line. The One hundred and fifth Pennsylvania and Fifth Michigan, both small regiments were sent. Just as they were forming the skirmishers were driven in, and they were charged upon by an overwhelming force of the enemy,and obliged to retire with a loss of a number of officers and men, together with the color bearers and color guard. Upon investigation I find the regiment behaved well, and the loss of the colors was owing to being attacked suddenly as they were forming into line by a very much superior force. The regiment was composed of the veterans of the One hundred and fifth and Sixty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and had both of their national colors with it. The officers and men have always sustained a good reputation for gallant conduct.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. MOTT,

Brevet Major-General.

Major S. CARNCROSS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

*But see revised statement, p.155.