War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0256 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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night upon the picket-lines, in the discharge of my duties as corps officer of the day. I am making still further investigations, and just as soon as possible I will report the result. I have put all the officers under arrest, and will prefer charges against them.

Captured from Sixty-ninth [New York], 164; from One hundred and eleventh [New York], 82-246; 1 officer from Sixty-ninth.

Very respectfully, yours,

C. D. MacDOUGALL,

Colonel 111th New York Volunteers, Commanding Brigade.

Captain W. R. DRIVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

HDQRS. THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, SECOND CORPS,

Before Petersburg, November 1, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I would respectfully report that I have been engaged nearly all day investigating the affair concerning the capture of the pickets of this brigade on the evening of October 30. Second Lieutenant Hoff, One hundred and eleventh [New York Infantry], who was on post Numbers 1 of the One hundred and eleventh, states that he was sitting by the fire at his post and heard a body of men coming down the line along that occupied by the Sixty-ninth [New York]; supposed it was the new relief, and commenced preparing his men to move out. He stepped to one side to let them pass and noticed men with blue caps, light-blue overcoats, and gray pants. As soon as he discovered the color of the pants he immediately started to tell the officer of the picket that the enemy were capturing his men. This seems the most disgraceful affair of the whole. Had this officer attended properly to his duties and informed post Numbers 2, he might have opened fire upon the enemy and scattered the whole party. Instead of that he ran away to tell the officer in command and let the enemy pass on; and post Numbers 2, supposing also it was the relief, were captured, and so on down nearly along the whole line occupied by the One hundred and eleventh. Lieutenant Murphy, of the Sixty-ninth, states that a party of the enemy came up along the line of the Sixty-ninth almost to his post, but were discovered and halted; giving no reply, were fired upon and dispersed. Had Lieutenant Hoff, of the One hundred and eleventh given the alarm quietly to the posts on his, left, he might have accomplished a splendid feat by capturing the enemy instead of being captured by them. He has been placed in arrest and charges are preferred against him. From all the facts I can gather, I am satisfied that the first approach of the enemy was through the lines of the Sixty-ninth. They then separated, half passing up and half down the line. The fact that ten of that regiment deserted to the enemy while on duty there would indicate that the enemy must have known something of the position. Captain Mumford, of the One hundred and eleventh, who was captured by them, but escaped in the woods near their lines, estimated their number at about 150 to 200. About a dozen stragglers have come in to-day belonging to the One hundred and eleventh and Sixty-ninth. I apprehend many more of the cowardly rascals will turn up.

I have the honor to remain, captain, very respectfully,

C. D. MacDOUGALL,

Colonel 111th New York Volunteers, Commanding Brigade.

Captain W. R. DRIVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.