War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0217 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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bridge-heads at Jones' Neck. It was supposed that my corps could be readily disembarked from boats by running along shore and throwing out gang-planks, while General Birney used the upper bridge and the cavalry the lower. Leaving Major Mitchell, aide-de-camp, to superintend the embarkation of the infantry, I went up to Deep Bottom, accompanied by General Ingalls and a part of my staff, for the purpose of selecting places for landing the troops. I foresaw that the difficulties of disembarkation would be greater than were apprehended, and at my suggestions the transports left City Point at 10 p. m. instead of at midnight, as was originally contemplated. Colonel Morgan, chief of staff, preceded them with a lighter and materials for constructing temporary wharves. As this expedition was one of considerable magnitude, and accomplished perhaps less than was hoped, I think proper to insert here extracts from the order issued to commanders on the afternoon of the 13th:

CONFIDENTIAL CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

City Point, August 13, 1864.

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VI. At daybreak, or as soon [as] General Mott's division is disembarked, he will proceed up the New Market and Malvern Hill road, driving the enemy into his intrenched line behind Bailey's Creek, or beyond it, if practicable. During this operation the cavalry under General Gregg will cover the right flank of General Mott's division. As soon as the Second and First Division, Second Corps, are disembarked they will, under command of General Barlow, move to General Mott's right, and assault the enemy's line near the Jennings house. If the line is carried General Barlow will move to his left and uncover General Mott's front, who will then advance along the New Market road.

VII. The cavalry will cover the right flank of General Barlow's command during this operations. As soon as the Central and Charles City Court-House roads are uncovered by the advance of the infantry, General Gregg will proceed to excuse the orders already received by him, identical with those of July 25.

VIII. General Birney, with his command, will be prepared to attack the enemy in position behind Four-Mile Run at daybreak. The hour for attack will, however, be specially designated to General Birney. If successful, he will advance along the New Market and Kingsland roads to the junction of the Varina road; then along the Varina road to the Mill road, securing, if possible, the cross-roads at Osborne's old turnpike.

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By order of Major-General Hancock:

FRANCIS A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

As I feared, the command was not able to disembark rapidly; the boats could not run near enough to the shore, and the difficulty materially increased as the tide was running out. Many of the boast were not adapted to the transportation of troops, and considerable delay was caused in landing. I had taken the precaution to send all led and pack horses and all saddle-horses that could possibly be spared around by Bermuda Hundred. Notwithstanding the exertions of the officers, it was 9 o'clock in the morning before the command was disembarked. One boat, containing 1,200 men of General Barlow's division, grounded in the river, and the troops were not gotten ashore until some time later. I had previously visited General Birney and postponed his assault. General Mott moved out on the New Market and Malvern Hill road, as directed, and proceeded with little opposition to Bailey's Creek, where the enemy were found, as on the previous occasion, in a very strong position. It was intended that General Barlow should keep the force under his command (nearly 10,000 men) well in hand, and not attempt to develop a line of battle from General Mott's right. The thick woods prevented my knowing accurately what disposition he was making. It appears, however, that he extended to the right, carry