War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0025 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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of his forces. A force of some 8,000 men were sent south yesterday under General Potter to secure his return. The latest news contained in Richmond papers of yesterday from Sherman's army says that on the 7th he was east of the Ogeechee, twenty-five miles from Savannah, marching on that place. On the 6th he had marched his army eighteen miles.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington.

CITY POINT, VA., December 11, 1864-8.30 p. m.

The following dispatch from General Warren has just been received from General Meade:

SUSSEX COURT-HOUSE, December 11, 1864.

General MEADE:

I have completely destroyed the railroad track from the Nottoway to Hicksford, and my command is all at the crossing of the Nottoway. Time did not allow me to go in between Nottoway and Stony Creek, but that can be done at any time. I have met but trifling opposition or annoyance, but the marching and working night and day has been very fatiguing, and the weather very uncomfortable. The men, however, stood it all in good spirit, and we have made the best marching I have ever seen. The roads are now in a very bad condition. I propose to return to-morrow.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.

No. 2. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Michael R. Morgan, U. S. Army, Chief Commissary of Subsistence of Armies operating against Richmond, of operations September 16.

OFFICE CHIEF COMMISSARY, ARMIES OPERATING AGAINST RICHMOND,

City Point, Va., September 22, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit herewith the report of the officer in charge of the cattle herd at the time of its capture; also, the report of the officer who has the general charge of cattle and forage of the subsistence department of the armies operating against Richmond,* together with a true copy of an official dispatch from headquarters Army of the Potomac to the assistant adjutant-general at your headquarters, that it was safe to graze the herd at Coggins' Point. Having some time before been shown a dispatch sent to you by General Meade that the cattle herd was not safe because, if I remember right, the cavalry had been sent over to Deep Bottom, I had them brought in and foraged

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* See reports of Woodward and Richardson, following.

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