War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0022 Chapter LIV. OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C.

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General Butler, on the right of the James, and General Meade, southwest of petersburg, occupy the same position as yesterday. There has been very little fighting to-day; a few prisoners, however, have been captured. General Butler reports having last evening sent two brigades of infantry with a little cavalry within a few hundred yards of the inner line of works east of Richmond, meeting with no opposition.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington.

VARINA, October 10, 1864.

I find our losses the other day were much less than first reported; 400 will about cover our entire loss in killed, wounded, and captured. The enemy's loss were many more. About 150 men were captured, and a great many dead fell into our hands. The loss of the enemy could not be less than 1,000 or 1,200.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.

CITY POINT, VA., October 10, 1864.

Our entire loss in the enemy's attack on our lines on Friday, the 7th instant, does not exceed 300 in killed, wounded, and missing. The enemy's loss is estimated by General Butler at 1,000. The Richmond Whig of the 8th, speaking of the attack, has the following:

The gallant General Gregg, commanding a Texan brigade, fell in the advance. Among other casualties we have to report General Bratton, of South Carolina, badly wounded; Colonel Haskell, Seventh South Carolina Infantry [Cavalry], severely wounded in face, and Major Haskell, of the South Carolina artillery, also wounded. Rumor stated that General Gary had been killed.

Since Friday there has been no fighting whatever.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Hon, E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington.

CITY POINT, VA., October 27, 1864-9 p. m.

I have just returned from the crossing of the Boydton plank road with Hatcher's Creek. Our line now extends from its former left to Armstrong's Mill, thence by the south bank of Hatcher's Creek to the point above named. No attack was made during the day further than to drive pickets and the cavalry inside of the main works. Our casualties have been light, probably less than 200 killed, wounded, and missing. The same probably is true with the enemy. We captured, however, 7 loaded teams on the way from Stony Creek to the enemy, about a dozen beef-cattle, a traveling forge, and 75 to 100 prisoners. On our