War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 1090 Chapter LIII. LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI

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all claims will be adjusted. In view of all these things I again say to you that I have no request to make of the President. He will without asking do all for us that we should expect. I wish you, however, to assure the President that the Seminoles are yet true and loyal. Their treaty stipulations are sacred. The destiny of your Government shall be ours; if she falls we will go with her; if she triumphs no rejoicing will be more sincere than ours. Permit me to express to you the gratification we feel because of your visit. We thank you for the very friendly and satisfactory address of this morning. We feel strengthened and encouraged. We will remember your words when you are far away; we will profit by them. We wish you to visit us often; we think you are a good friend to us; we have confidence in you. May you have a safe and pleasant return to Richmond, and may you come again shortly to our wild western land. May the blessing of Almighty God rest upon our common cause.

The Indian troops, it may be well to remark in conclusion, have been doing recently good service, and have met with many successes. The achievements of the Choctaw Brigade in Arkansas and the Cherokee Brigade in the Indian country, have merited and obtained the high commendation in special orders of the general commanding the Trans-Mississippi Department. Before my departure from the Indian country, many of them, The Choctaws, Cherokees, and Seminoles, had re-enlisted with great unanminity for the war, and I doubt not that their example has been followed by all their brethren in the service.

Respectfully submitted.

S. S. SCOTT,

Commissioner.

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HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Shreveport, December 1, 1864.

Major-General Magruder,

Commanding District of Arkansas:

GENERAL: The commanding general directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 28th ultimo, and to say that whenever the order is given the destruction of cotton should be complete. If you have directed it to be done in the country east of the Quachita River employ a sufficient cavalry force to accomplish it thoroughly, whether the property of the Government or of individuals. There are in the counties of Chicot, Drew, and Ashley 600 bales of cotton owned by Messrs. Campbell, & co., of whom A. R. McDonald is the agent. Permission has been granted by the United States Government through Lord Lyons for the removal of this cotton, without interference or injury. The Confederate States Government has long since been paid in gold for it and purchased supplies with the proceeds, and having guaranteed its safe exit it must be exempted from destruction.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Shreveport, December 1, 1864.

Major-General Magruder,

Commanding District of Arkansas, Camden, Ark.:

GENERAL: The commanding general instructs me to say to you that if the enemy should advance for the purpose of making a campaign against you this winter, you are authorized to order the Fifth Brigade, Texas Cavalry (now commanded by Colonel Gurley), from near Laynesport to your support, notifying General Maxey of the fact. The com-