War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 1063 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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the enemy. The officer was sent expressly to communicate the fact, and to await at this point the new one from General Smith. He requests that it be put in cipher by means of a key-word, known only to Colonel William Preston Johnston, of the President's staff, and General Buckner.

FRANK GARDNER,

Major-General.

(Copy sent to Chief of Signal Corps.)

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully submitted to His Excellency the President.

JOHN W. RIELY,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CHURCHILL'S DIVISION,

Numbers 65.

Lewisville, November 18, 1864.

I. The present encampment at this place will be known as Camp Lee, in honor of the gallant chieftain of the Virginia army.

II. Brigade commanders will inform these headquarters, without delay, whether General Orders 74, from district headquarters, were complied with. If not, they will state the reasons in writing why it has not been done.

By command of Major-General Churchill:

W. F. WRIGHT,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF INDIAN TERRITORY,

Fort Towson, C. N., November 18, 1864-10 p.m.

Lieutenant-Colonel MACLEAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I am directed by the major-general commanding this district to acknowledge the receipt by to-night's mail of your letter of November 10, written twenty miles northeast of Perryville, and in reply he directs me to say that every assistance in his power will be continued to be extended to Major-General Price and his command while in this district. So soon as the commanding general learned that General Price was coming out of Missouri in this direction he gave orders to the commissary of subsistence department to make provision for General Price's command, and many have already been fed who have passed Doaksville. To-morrow morning provisions will be forwarded to meet Colonel Tyler's brigade on the road, and fresh mules at the same time to aid General Price with his transportation. This letter of yours received by to-night's mail is the first intelligence received by the major-general commanding direct from General Price, and he does not as yet know what route his command will take the provisions may certainly meet the troops.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. M. SCOTT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.