War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 1057 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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plies and for instructions, where they can remain until the spring or the movements of the enemy require their presence elsewhere. They will be placed so low on the river as not to exhaust the supplies which may be made available for your troops. The department commander desires, general, to impress upon you the necessity of reducing the cavalry force. The supplies in the department are not sufficient to sustain such large numbers of mounted men, and the efficiency of the whole arm is impaired by the excess; this should be understood by the men. In justice to themselves, as well as to the country, some must be dismounted, the horses may be sent to their homes, or, if fit and required for artillery service, they should be appraised and just compensation allowed.

I have the honor to, be, general, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Camden, November 17, 1864-2 a.m.

Major-General WHARTON,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: You will hold yourself in readiness to move at a moment's warning with your troops to intercept the enemy on his return, should he have attacked General Price. You will notify Colonel Gurley of the supposed expedition of the enemy, and request his co-operation to cut him off in case it should be so, and hold himself also in readiness to move at a moment's warning. This will not interfere with the beeves, &c., sent to relieve General Price. You will inform Colonel Mitchell that his wagons, directed to be loaded with flour, will be kept in readiness to move notwithstanding the order given a few hours since to place them at the disposal of Major Hill.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. P. TURNER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Camden, November 17, 1864.

Major General J. A. WHARTON,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: A letter just received from General Maxey states that General Price was at Perryville on the 14th instant. You will send your column on the most direct route to that place, or move it in such direction as will afford General Price the earliest relief possible. As soon as the commanding officer of the column learns that General Price is entirely beyond danger from the enemy he will send forward the supplies under a proper escort, and return to camp on Red River, so as to injure the horses as little as possible.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. MAGRUDER,

Major-General, Commanding.

67 R R-VOL XLI, PT IV