War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 1043 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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corps, and a regiment of infantry as an escort. Make your preparations with the utmost dispatch and take up the line of march at he earliest moment. I should accompany the expedition myself, as I informed you when we parted, but am prevented by a severe attack of sickness, from which I am not yet sufficiently recovered. Gano's brigade has attached to it Dashiell's battery of mounted artillery. This brigade, with your own cavalry, will probably amount to 5,000 men and sixteen pieces of artillery, some of which are rifled, besides which Terry's regiment may arrive in time, but must not be waited for. General Maxey states that if notified with certainty, and speedily, when the move would commence, and when get to Fort Smith, General Cooper could from a junction at that place.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. MAGRUDER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Camden, November 13, 1864.

Brigadier General W. R. BOGGS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have to-day received for the first time an answer from Major-General Maxey, giving all the information in his possession in reference to the proposed expedition to Fort Smith. Major-General Maxey says, with regard to my application for the co-operation of Brigadier-General Cooper's division as well as Brigadier-General Gano's brigade, that Brigadier-General Cooper's troops will form the junction at Fort Smith, if informed of the movement promptly and with certainty, from the tenor of which I infer that he deems the expedition practicable. He seems to think it a matter of course that Gano's brigade will form apart of the expedition, although he does not mention it in his communication. He says, however, that 5,000 good troops and four batteries will be necessary to reduce Fort Smith. General Wharton will have about 3,000 cavalry; Gano's brigade, I think, will number about 2,000. I have ordered three batteries for Wharton's portion of the expedition; Gano has one. I have caused copies of my letter of instructions to Major-General Wharton to be sent to Major-General Maxey. It is important that Gano's brigade and Wharton's forces should move together or in concert. I request, therefore, that an order be sent through General Maxey, directing Gano's brigade to report by letter to General Wharton. Gano's brigade is, I believe, on Red River at or near Laynesport. Wharton has with him twenty-five days' supply of beef for 5,000 men. I have directed him to take with him all the flour from Fulton which he has the means to carry, and will send him, if practicable, as soon as the infantry can spare a portion of its transportation, an additional supply of flour. I have left the route to be selected by General Wharton, and urge upon him all dispatch. Unless Gano's brigade shall be ordered to him, he will not have men enough to accomplish anything. I learn that Steele has sent several thousand troops toward Fort Smith, with a view of intercepting Price. Please direct Terry's regiment of cavalry to proceed without delay to General Wharton, if not already ordered to him.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. MAGRUDER,

Major-General, Commanding.