War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0957 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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[Indorsement.]

West Baton Rouge and district are interdicted points. No communication with them is allowed except by authority of the department commander until the interdiction is removed. The object is to break up the unlawful trade that has for some time been carried on from that point. The enforcement of the blockade by water devolves on the navy, of non-intercourse by land on the army. The commander of the naval district has been notified that West Baton Rouge is an interdicted point, but with a proper understanding between the commanders of military and naval districts there should be no conflict of authority.

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General.

BATON ROUGE, December 29, 1864.

(Received 3.30 p. m.)

First Lieutenant C. S. SARGENT,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

There are not yet 1,000 cavalry here. General Bailey expects them this evening. If the cavalry arrives the infantry will be embarked at once. General Gillmore is here to-day inspecting fortifications.

GEO. L. ANDREWS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

LITTLE ROCK, December 29, 1864.

General CLAYTON:

Permit no persons to pass out of your lines without permission from these headquarters.

By order of Major General J. J. Reynolds:

W. D. GREEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF LITTLE ROCK,

Little Rock, Ark., December 29, 1864.

Colonel W. F. GEIGER,

Commanding Cavalry Brigade, Brownsville, Ark.:

COLONEL: You will deliver the following instructions to the commanding officer of the expedition east of White River, which you will put in motion as soon after the 1st proximo as it can conveniently be ready:

The expedition will start provided with ten days' rations and the usual amount of transportation, the object being not to make a forced march, but to travel leisurely through and country, routing, dispersing, and capturing guerrillas, consuming forage and gathering beeves. The expedition will proceed to Augusta by the most convenient route. Steam-boats will be provided to assist ferrying and to replenish supplies of provisions. The command will operate in the neighborhood of Augusta for a week or ten days if forage holds out, and then move to Cotton