War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0864 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

New Orleans, December 15, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel SMITH,

Plaquemine:

Dispatch received. Movement of troops is progressing slowly. Thirty-fourth Indiana has been ordered to Texas. I have made arrangements for relieving them, which I think will be satisfactory. They will be ready to go long before transportation can be had. Over 300 paroled prisoners have arrived from Texas. Goffe has had great trouble in getting a boat to take the troops to For Jackson owing to movements ordered from superior headquarters, but the worst is over now. Major Jackson behaved so badly that I put him in arrest. Ask the general if I had not better send in the tri-monthly without waiting for his signature. They were ready yesterday.

FREDERICK SPEED,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Morganza, La., December 15, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Mil. Div. of West Mississippi, New Orleans:

SIR: I have the honor to report that the First Delaware Battery, First Lieutenant Thomas A. Porter commanding, left his point on the 11th instant for the Department of Arkansas in pursuance to orders from headquarters Military Division of West Mississippi.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

DANIEL ULLMANN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

December 15, 1864-6 p. m.

Captain S. E. GRAVES,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Little Rock:

Colonel Mattson, Third Minnesota, and command have returned with 30 prisoners, including Lieutenant-Colonel Crabtree and 3 other commissioned officers. He destroyed several muskets and captured a few barrels of salt being smuggled from the Mississippi River. The only loss or accident to his command was one of the Ninth Kansas, lost over-board in some manner unknown on the way up in the night. A part of the Ninth Kansas reached Butt's Camp Ford at 3 o'clock yesterday morning, but the river was not fordable and they did not cross. Colonel Mattson had Augusta surrounded by 2.30; moved out with infantry and cavalry to the ferry, eight miles and a half, and crossed Cache River successfully before daylight. McCray was three miles above the Widow Thomas' place, and was pursued five miles. Dobbin also escaped. If the crossing could have been made at Butt's Camp Ford, no doubt both he and McCray would have been captured. Rebel citizens expressed their gratification to have our troops come to capture and drive these fellows out.

C. C. ANDREWS,

Brigadier-General.

(Copy of General Steele.)