War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0863 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Two terrific explosions were heard in the direction of Mobile last night. I think it probable that some of the rebel gun-boats have come to grief by our torpedo corps.

I am, colonel, very respectfully,

G. GRANGER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

New Orleans, La., December 15, 1864.

Major General GORDON GRANGER,

Commanding Dist. of West Florida and Southern Ala., Fort Gaines, Ala.:

SIR: The commanding general directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your communication (no date) in relation to your movements against the Mobile and Montgomery and the Mobile and Ohio Railroads. The cavalry force now at West Pascagoula is under orders to return here, and a portion of them are to be sent to Memphis to form part of an expedition which is now being fitted out for the purpose of cutting Hoods' communication as near, his base of operations as possible. The commanding general has, however, no objection to your using part of the cavalry, while it is awaiting transportation at West Pascagoula, if it can be done with decided advantage and without being committed to so extensive operations as, in any manner, to interfere with their return to this city the moment transportation is ready.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

New Orleans, La., December 15, 1864.

Brigadier General J. W. DAVIDSON,

Chief of Cavalry, Military Division of West Mississippi,

Commanding Cavalry Forces, West Pascagoula:

SIR: The commanding general has just received information that General Granger sent day before yesterday a force of 1,500 infantry and 500 cavalry from Barrancas in the direction of Pollard, for the purpose of destroying the Mobile and Montgomery Railroad. General Granger was himself to start last evening from Point Aupin and East Pascagoula with 3,000 infantry, to make a diversion in favor of this movement, and, if possible, to strike the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and do such other damage to the enemy as may be possible.* If this movement can be furthered in any way, by any little diversion which could be made by part of your force, whilst waiting transportation, the commanding general has no objection to such diversion being made, providing that the troops are not committed to any operations which would delay their return the moment transportation is ready. The general desires that 2,000 of the best cavalry should be sent here with the utmost dispatch, as he intends to send them to Memphis for temporary service, on an expedition which is being fitted out for the purpose of cutting Hood's communications nearer his base of operations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See McKeans' report of this expedition, Vol. XLIV.