War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0851 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTH KANSAS,

Paola, December 13, 1864.

Colonel C. R. JENNISON,

Fifteenth Kansas, Cavalry in Arrest:

SIR: The major-general commanding the district directs me to say in reply to your communication of this date, asking for a personal interview with him, that your request cannot be granted, and that all communications from you must be in writing through the assistant adjutant-general's office.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. S. HAMPTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., December 14, 1864-9.30 a. m.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington:

What has been done with Steele? He is too good a soldier immediately in command of troops to leave idle. As Canby asked his removal, I think it will be better to order Steele here in command of the Ninth Corps and send Parke to Canby.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WASHINGTON, December 14, 1864-2 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point, Va.:

General Canby ordered Steele to Cairo before he received the orders of the War Department or my letter. By these orders Steele was to report to him at New Orleans. I think from Canby's letter that that arrangement will suit him. I would not change the order till Canby is heard from, after receiving the general order, as he has very few good officers and I think will want Steele's services.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

OFFICE OF CHIEF ENGINEER, MIL. DIV. OF WEST MISS.,

New Orleans, December 14, 1864 .

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: The following extracts, relating to the armament of Fort Pickering, Memphis, and taken from a letter addressed to me by Lieutenant A. H. Holgate, chief engineer, Department of Mississippi, I respectfully submit for the information of the major-general commanding:

The guns as laid down on the sketch (proposed armament of the new line ordered) are the guns taken from that party of the fort which is to be abandoned. I have carefully examined the carriages of these guns. Every front-pintle carriage, (thirteen carriages of 32-pounder are here referred to) is unserviceable; the chassis, being rotten, will probably break at the first fire under a full charge and high elevation. I have not yet examined the remainder of the carriages in the fort for want of time.