War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0814 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI, Numbers 80.

Springfield, Mo., December 9, 1864.

In compliance with telegraphic orders from Brigadier-General Sanborn, commanding District of Southwest Missouri, I hereby assume command of the district during his absence. All existing orders will remain in full force until otherwise ordered.

J. J. GRAVELY,

Colonel Eighth Cavalry Missouri State Militia.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI, Numbers 325.

Springfield, Mo., December 9, 1864.

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2. Major John Cosgrove, Eighth Cavalry Missouri State Militia, having been appointed chef of cavalry and district inspector, is hereby relieved from duty as commanding officer of the post of Lebanon, Mo. Upon receipt of this order he will turn over the command of that pot to the senior officer present, and report for duty at these headquarters.

3. Major Roswell K. Hart, Sixteenth Missouri Cavalry Volunteers, is assigned to duty as commanding officer of the post of Lebanon. He will, upon the receipt of this order, proceed to Lebanon and assume command of that post.

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By order of Brigadier-General Sanborn.

WM. T. KITTREDGE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

Macon, Mo., December 9, 1864.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Commanding Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I am getting my district once more into working order. The troops of my command have mostly returned to the district from their pursuit of Price, and a thorough inspection of the entire command is now being made. Reports and returns, many of which were destroyed with my headquarters papers at Glasgow, are being duplicated, and I will soon be able to furnish you full report of the operations of the troops of this district during the Price invasion. The Enrolled Missouri Militia, who rendered valuable service during the campaign, have nearly all been relieved. The district has been divided into sub-districts, each under the command of a good field officer, and every effort is being made to restore tranquillity to the disturbed sections in the disloyal counties. Society has been plunged into a fearfully distracted state by the advent of Price. Very many of the resident rebels must speedily show works meet for repentance or emigrate where their sympathies lead them. I am causing a full directory of disloyalists to be made, to which you can apply your 10 per cent. rule. I believe your plan will work out good results for Missouri. First, send aut 10 per cent. of the most influential and guilty rebels and study results. Loyalty, where honestly espoused even at this late day, should be kindly encouraged, but persons who now, in 1864, especially after Price's villainous treatment of his best friends have