War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0771 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC- UNION.

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advantage then in quieting the Indians. I hope,major, that you will take my suggestions in the spirit I have intended them, and that, if upon mature consideration you deem them correct, you urge upon the department commander the importance of concentrating a sufficient force on the plains to properly chastise those savage devils. Something must be done and that quickly, or the business on the plains must be discontinued and the frontier settlements abandoned.

I am, very truly, your obedient servant,

S. M. STRICKLER,

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UPPER ARKANSAS,

Fort Riley, Kans., December 8, 1864.

Respectfully- forwarded to Major C. S. Charlot, assistant adjutant- general, Department of Kansas, for the information of the general commanding.

Mr. Strickler, the writer of the within, is a resident of junction City, Kans.: is a man of means and influence, and is supposed to be well posted in regard to condition of affairs on the western border.

B. S . HENNING,

Major Third Wisconsin Cavalry Volunteers, Commanding District.

[Second Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

Fort Leavenworth, December 16, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded for the information of the War Department. If my suggestions have reached Washington this may add testimony. I think the Indians are well convinced of our strength and their danger, but their won necessities and inherent love of strife have induced them to extend their usual robberies to our neglected frontier and overland travel.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major- General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

Fort Leavenworth, December 5, 1864.

His Excellency Governor JOHN EVANS,

Washington, D. C.:

GOVERNOR: Since you left I have further news of occasional attacks on coaches, trains, and unguarded squads, showing, evidently, that small war parties continue to infest our lines of travel, and Indian troubles therefore seem to continue. In the meantime some of the Arapahoes and Cheyennes come into or near Fort Lyon and surrender, as they pretend, offering to comply with almost any terms. Of course, some of these are really anxious to avoid quarrel, while others, as I believe, come in to get food for winter. Probably 2,000 or more are thus asking for mercy, and I suppose in spite of my severe orders they at Lyon, and if these Indians are to become a burden on the Government they ought to be located at some more convenient point for feeding them. I confess myself entirely undecided and uncertain as to what can be done with such nominal Indian prisoners. The receiving of some