War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0757 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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he allow Mrs. Earl to go to him. We insisted upon going on with-out our escort under charge of a guard of is men, offering him any pledges of secrecy that he might wish, but to no avail. He assured us that Lieutenant Earl was doing well, was well cared for and would receive the best treatment in his power to afford him. He took charge of a quantity of supplies of delicacies, liquors, and clothing which we had taken with us, and assured us he would forward them immediately to Lieutenant Earl. He permitted us to pass into town to get breakfast, where we saw and conversed with Dr. Greenfield, the physician who first attended Lieutenant Earl after being wounded, but who either through ignorance or from a worse motive gave us such conflicting accounts of is wounds that we are unable to state with any degree of certainty whether they are mortal or not, but ascertained that he was struck in the face by two buckshot which inflicted painful but not dangerous wounds. He was also struck by another buckshot or ball on the left side of the chest near the clavicle, but whether it opened the cavity of the left thorax or not we are unable to determine, although from the direction of the wounds. He was also struck by another buckshot or ball on the left side of the chest near the clavicle, but whether it opened the cavity of the left thorax or not we are unable to determine, although from the direction of the wounds as described to us and the position of the man who shot him we are led to hope it did not. From conflicting statements made to us we are led to believe that Lieutenant Earl was removed but a short distance beyond the town, and from the fact that three rings that were on the hand of the lieutenant when he was wounded were found in the possession of three of the rebel soldiers, one being the man who claimed to have shot him, we doubt their professions of good treatment. The rings were recovered from the soldiers, and given to Mrs. Earl by Lieutenant Paddock, at our earnest request. A sergeant of the Confederate scouts was pointed out to us by several citizens as the man shot Lieutenant Earl, but we think the statement false, and that he was shot by a citizen of Fayette. A boy by the name of John Hays, a lad of twelve years of age, who was attached to Lieutenant Earl in some capacity which we could not ascertain and who remained with him after he was wounded, was held by Lieutenant Paddock as a prisoner of war. Having accomplished all within our power for the relief of Lieutenant Earl we returned to this place, arriving at 6 p. m., when we had the honor verbally [to report] and deliver to you Lieutenant Paddock's written reply to you communication.

We have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servants,

P. A. WILLIS,

Surg., Forty- eighth Ohio Vet. Infty and Post Surg., Natchez, Miss.

A. E. CAROTHERS,

Asst. Surg., U. S . Vols.,in Charge of General Hospital, Natchez, Miss.

HEADQUARTERS DETACHMENT NINETEENTH CORPS,

Memphis, Tenn., December 3, 1864.

Brigadier General E. S. DENNIS,

Commanding Division, Nineteenth Corps:

The general commanding directs that your order one of your batteries to move up to- day to the Bolivar road and encamp in the vicinity of the Third Brigade, on such ground as General Shaler may designate.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. WILSON,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.