War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0748 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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may be relieved. Get a complete report of affair which led to the capture of the squad of Rhode Island cavalry. Your telegram of this evening is received.

T. W. SHERMAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSE OF NEW ORLEANS, New Orleans, December 2, 1864.

Brigadier General R. A. CAMERON,

Commanding La Fourche District:

I am instructed by the brigadier-general commanding to say that he has received your letter of November 30.* The result of the reconnaissance south is bad enough. There is but one way to stop this state of things, viz, to enforce discipline in the most rigid manner. I am further directed to inform you that the report does not state whether the two Lukes, Messrs. Hancock, Whitfield, and Wasser, were arrested; if not, they should have been. This case should also be further investigated. Captain Moore will probably be hanged a as spy if the blockade-runner recognized him. Under ordinary circumstances Luke should be held as a hostage, but the commanding general does not think Captain Moore has proved himself worthy of taking trouble in his behalf.

I am, sir, respectfully,

FREDERIC SPEED,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY FORCES,

MIL. DIV. OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, No. 10.

Franklinton, La., December 2, 1864.

I. On crossing the Pearl River and advancing into that portion of the enemy's country, where at any time day can concentrate a force equal to our own in cavalry and superior in artillery, the chief of cavalry find is necessary, and for the last time, to announce the principles upon which this expedition must be conducted. They are: perfect subordination, no straggling, and no plundering. These are not rules of my own creation; they are from the Articles of War, by which the Armies of the United States are governed. By following them I shall have that confidence in you which a general should have in his troops, and you, when you lay aside the garb of the soldier, will the better put on that of the law-abiding citizen.

II. All supplies of subsistence, forage, horses, and mules necessary and convenient for this command will be taken from the country with a free hand by division commanders, by special details under staff officers, and distributed without stint to the troops.

III. From to-day forward all led horses, officers' servants, and negro cooks will be formed in a body and marched with the baggage train, under an officer of each brigade, and under no circumstances will they be permitted in the fighting column.

IV. Commanders of divisions will in coming into camp designate their line and order of battle, the artillery on the key-point of the lines. Any attack made on us at night or unsaddled will be met by this command at once as infantry.

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*See Part I, p.927.

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