War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0723 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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him unable to be removed. My cavalry being with General Dana, I can only send out a surgeon with Lieutenant Early's wife, under flag of truce, there being no competent surgeon or surgical implements at Fayette. I doubt whether the enemy will allow him to be brought away, even if that be possible. I apprehend a fatal result, as he was bleeding profusely and destitute of proper medical aid. I will do what I can to bring him away and to save him. It was not in a fight, but a murderous fire from houses. It appears that Lieutenant Earl went up on the Cowles last night about ten miles, and with his party started for Brookhaven, via Fayette. I was not aware of the movement until now, Lieutenant Earl not being under my directions.

Yours, &c.,

M. BRAYMAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-The wound in the breast was a ball, the buckshot breaking his jaw.

B.

LITTLE ROCK, ARK., November 30, 1864.

Hon. A. LINCOLN,

President of the United States, Washington, D. C.:

Aggregate of votes cast in Arkansas at last election, 12,426; only 222 against the new constitution. I hope the delegation to Congress will be received. There is no doubt of their loyalty, and they all sympathize with the present Administration. But a small portion of the State is now occupied by rebel troops, i.e., a line from Camden to Red River, and they can be expelled when the roads become practicable if a small addition be made to my present force.

F. STEELE,

Major-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS, Devall's Bluff, Ark., November 30, 1864.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

DEAR SIR: There is nothing of particular interest to be reported from here now. We have just had three inspectors here, and the practice of sending round inspectors frequently is of great advantage to the service. The two brigades of the Second Division (commanded by Brigadier-General Dennis), Nineteenth Army Corps, which were here a short time, have gone down the river, destined for Memphis; but before they had all got started we heard that the Memphis scare was over. The Arkansas and White River are falling, so that navigation on the former river will be but temporary. The weather here is now quite mild.

I have the honor to be, very truly, yours,

C. C. ANDREWS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.