War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0713 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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rises. At present stage they can get neither way. The principal portion of the cargo of the Doane has been arrived. The river men consider the prospect for a rise as good. I will try and get the Annie Jacobs to this point if possible.

A. H. RYAN,

Colonel.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE FRONTIER, Fort Smith, Ark., November 29, 1864.

Colonel S. H. WATTLES, Commanding Indian Brigade:

SIR: I sent you an order yesterday by Mr. Foreman to send up five additional companies to meet the mule train. That order is countermanded, as I am satisfied, upon a further examination of Colonel Blair's last dispatch, the mule train is coming with the ox train. Your dispatches of 9 p.m., 27th instant, reached here last evening. I fully approve of what you have done in sending up re-enforcement to meet the train. I trust you have sent the same information as to the movements of the enemy to the commanding officer of the train. I would send again to Colonel Moonlight, if he is not beyond your reach, urging him by all means to join the ox train come back with it to Fort Gibson. The First Arkansas Infantry will start immediately for Fort Gibson and will push through by forces marches. If you can send up any more troops from Fort Gibson to re-enforce the train, do so by all means. If the two companies of colored troops and two companies of Indian troops ordered several days ago have not already left the ox train and started for Fort Scott, countermand the order and keep them with the train. I trust you will keep me posted as to the movements of the enemy. Be sure and make the train safe.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

JOHN M. THAYER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE FRONTIER, Fort Smith, Ark., November 29, 1864.

Colonel WATTLES:

DEAR SIR: I have directed Colonel Williams to proceed with all haste to meet the train and take command. Give him as much of an escort as you cant. It is possible for you to furnish him with some mounted Pin Indians? Do so if you can. Send forward more troops if you can spare them. The train night be parked on the other side of the Neosho and be defended till the First Arkansas could be sent up. I should think, however, that troops enough had been sent to make the train safe, but do the best you can. I would have directed you to go up and take command of the train but for the reason that I want you to look after Gibson. Do whatever you think ought to be done without waiting to hear from me.

Very truly, yours,

JOHN M. THAYER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.- Colonel Blair sent one section of artillery and some of his troops with the train. It is possible they may turn back on meeting our troops. Send up and have them come through to Gibson.

J. M. THAYER.