War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0711 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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I have given instructions to commandants of the frontier posts and stations to permit none of these stragglers to remain east of the James River, and to break up any trading establishment intended for trade with them. It has been necessary for me to furnish military escorts on two different occasions for Indian Department trains of supplies to the reservation on the Missouri at an inclement season of the year.

Eighth. In my report to your of military operations for the past year I stated that the Chippewas were discontented and dissatisfied on account of the payments of money being made to them in paper instead of gold. The influence of the British half-breeds is great among those bands of Chippewas who inhabit the region near the northern boundary line,and is used, as it is with the Sioux of the plains, to foment ill-feeling against the Government. In fact, there is general disaffection among the Chippewas, who believe themselves to have been defrauded by the agents and traders heretofore, and nothing but a fear of consequences prevents an outbreak among them. I have too many evidences of the existence of this semi-hostile disposition to permit me to doubt it. Until there are such changes and modifications in our Indian system as have been suggested, that savages of the Northwest can never be depended upon. If they do not, as heretofore, form combinations among the various bands to make war upon the whites in force, it will be simply because they feel the hopelessness of such attempts. If it is the object to change their hatred to the Government into respect and attachment it can be effected by imitating the policy of the British Government, which has succeeded so admirably,and which may be comprised in one sentence: of making no promise that is not faithfully performed and no threat that is not promptly carried into effect.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, No. 74.

New Orleans, La., November 29, 1864.

Surg. E. H. Abadie, U. S. Army, having reported at these headquarters, in accordance with Special Orders, No. 324, paragraph 30, dated War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, September 29, 1864, is hereby assigned to duty as chief medical officer respected accordingly.

By order of Major General E. R. S. Canby:

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 290.

Washington, November 29, 1864.

I. By direction of the President, Major General F. Steele is relieved from the command of the Seventh Army Corps and the Department of Arkansas, and Major General J. J. Reynolds is assigned to the command in his stead.

II. Major-General Steele will report to Major-General Canby for assignment to command.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.