War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0684 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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6,000 or 7,000 men there. This does not include the cavalry force on the east side of the bay. They are much dissatisfied, being mostly conscripts. The citizens also are, many of them, anxious for the Union force to take the city. The information saw there batteries near the Shell road without guns, and was told that most of the heavy guns had been removed from the land to the bay side to resist a naval attack. The principal work on the fortifications is on the island in front of the city. Major Llewellyn states positively that the colored soldiers captured by Forrest are employed on these works. This confirms the previous report to the same effect. At the north entrance of Spanish River and one iron-clad battery and the gun-boat Morgan. The rebels are very active in sinking torpedoes in the bay and river.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. JACKSON,

Second Lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Army.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, New Orleans, La., November 26, 1864.

COMMANDING OFFICER DISTRICT OF WEST FLORIDA, Pensacola, Fla.:

SIR: By direction of the major-general commanding you will please facilitate the transportation to within the rebel lines, under a flag of truce, such supplies as are instructed to the conduct of Captain J. Whytock, aide-de-camp of Major-General Washburn's staff, which supplies are allowed by the rebel authorities to be distributed to Union prisoners in their hands, under his supervision.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. MOREY,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, November 26, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel GEORGE B. DRAKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Gulf:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that in compliance with paragraph 13, Special Orders, 17, 1864, I proceeded to Baton Rouge, La., but on arriving there found the division of cavalry, commanded by Brigadier General A. L. Lee, on a field expedition, from which it did not return until Monday evening, 20th instant. The hard marching of the troops, and the rains and mud had been such that no part of this command was in readiness for inspection until Thursday. On that day General Davidson arrived and assumed the command of all the cavalry forces assigned to him by Special Orders, 180, headquarters Military Division of West Mississippi, New Orleans, November 19, 1864. That general's orders for preparation for an expedition, in which the division of General Lee and the brigade of Colonel E. J. Davis, from Morganza, constitute the main force, prevented my making an inspection in detail as contemplated by my orders. Nevertheless, I proceeded to make such examination of the condition of the horses, equipments, arms, ammunition, ambulances, and transportation as enables me to report to you the general good condition of the entire command for active field service. The