War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0675 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER, New Orleans, La., November 25, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Mil. Div. of West Miss., New Orleans, La.:

SIR: I have the honor to submit to your consideration a statement of the information received at this office this 25th day of November, 1864, from the following sources, the statement of Thomas Jones, Vicksburg, Miss., November 15; a report from Lieutenant Milton J. Roberts, Barrancas, Fla., November 18:

Parsons' brigade of cavalry are reported near Camden, on Saline River, moving in the direction of Camden. They are estimated at 1,100. Harrison's brigade of cavalry had gone to Alexandria, La., were dismounted and half deserted. They had been estimated 1,600. "Red" Harrison with a small regiment keeps up a courier-line between Camden and Alexandria. Captain Lee (guerrilla) was at Trinity, on Black River, with 500 men, mostly deserters, from Harrison's brigade, and paroled prisoners. Captain Hedrick was at Mr. Moore's place, three miles south of Girard Station on the Shreveport and Texas Railroad, with sixty men. Captain Disharrom was on the Tensas, in Madison Parish, La., with a company of independent scouts thirty strong. The Fifteenth Confederate Cavalry, Colonel Maury, at last accounts was distributed as follows: Three companies at Bluff Springs, three companies at Pollard, Fla., with Culpeper's battery of four guns; two companies at Milton, Fla., one company at Greenwood and one at Magnolia, with a picket of twenty men at Pine Barren bridge. The regiment is said to number 700. Tobin's battery, consisting of four guns (two brass howitzers, 12-pounders, and two rifled guns, 8-pounders) and 125 men, were at Greenwood. There were about 500 men stationed along the bay from Blakely to Mobile. There is to be a ferry at Bluff Sprigs near Holman's Bridge. They intend to decoy the Federal forces above these ferries and cross troops by them in their rear.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. JACKSON,

Second Lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS, New Orleans, November 25, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel DRAKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Gulf:

I find the country between College Point and Bayou Manchac entirely open, the cavalry force or mounted infantry formerly posted there having been recently withdrawn to Baton Rouge. I am informed that this belt of country is infested with parties of mounted guerrillas, and that they have recently carried off a large number of mules, and committed other acts of robbery carried off a large number of mules, and committed other acts of robbery upon plantations above College Point. I have not a single mounted man to send up there. Cannot a few companies of mounted men be spared from Baton Rouge? A small mounted force is indispensable to assist in keeping this country clear.

Very respectfully,

T. W. SHERMAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.