War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0652 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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the Winnebago and Sioux Agency near Crow Creek. I officially reported this matter several times last year, and I can see no improvement in the condition of the Indian at that agency since then; at least of the very few Indians still remaining there, for the greater part of them have left their reservation, having been actually starved out of it. The greater portion of the Winnebagoes have gone down the river to the Omaha Reservation. Here they frequently cross the Missouri River, and following up the Little Sioux River roam over the northwestern counties of Iowa, hunting and trapping, not unfrequently stealing from the settlers there, alarming the people very much. I am daily in fear that their conduct may be the cause of some of them being killed, and in consequence causing retaliation on the part of the Indians. This treaty-making with the Indians and large annuities appropriation are of little or no benefit to the Indian. As regards the Indians who have of late been hostile, I hope they will be left entirely under the control of the military authorities, as well as all traders who may be authorized to trade with them. I look upon this as necessary to maintain peace in future.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

ALF. SULLY,

Brigadier-General.

MILWAUKEE, WIS., November 22, 1864.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST:

SIR: In regard to the letter from Honorable a. W. Hubbard to the Secretary of War about sending some of the troops now in my district South, which letter has been referred to me, I have the honor to state I have nearly 2,000 men in that section of country, not 2,000 or 3,000 as stated. These men garrison posts from Fort Union down the Missouri to Sioux City, and from there north to the Minnesota frontier. Take from these 2,000 the sick, men on quartermaster's duty as teamsters, &c., and it will leave but about 1,500 men; not a very large force, considering the extent of country they occupy. Should peace be permanently made this winter with the Indians a part of this force could be withdrawn, but I do not think it would be prudent to do so now. As regards the Sixth Iowa Cavalry, I would like that regiment to be sent South, if their place could be filled by other troops. The regiment has only one year to serve, and it would be a benefit to it to see service a little different from the Indian service they have been in since they have been organized.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

ALF. SULLY,

Brigadier-General.

MILWAUKEE, November 22, 1864.

Brigadier-General ALLEN,

Chief Quartermaster, Louisville, Ky.:

Five full companies Thirtieth Wisconsin leave Quincy for Louisville to-day en route for Nashville.

J. F. MELINE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.