War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0650 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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FOR LEAVENWORTH, November 22, 1864.

Major-General BLUNT,

Fort Scott, Kans.:

I have been awaiting your return to leave here for a few days. I have but little knowledge of the affairs in your district, and if you are coming here, you can as well command it as me, besides, it is General Curtis' wish. Please answer.

THOS. A. DAVIES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL FIELD ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE BORDER, Numbers 7.

In the Field, Fort Scott, November 22, 1864.

I. The campaign against the rebel forces under General Price having successfully terminated, the following-named persons, volunteer aides on the staff of the commanding general, announced in General Orders, Numbers 5, are hereby relieved from further duty: Lieutenant Colonel J. T. Burris, late of the Tenth Regiment Missouri Volunteers; Major R. G. Ward, First Regiment Kansas Colored Volunteers; Captain A. J. Shannon, provost-marshal District of South Kansas; Captain T. E. Milhoan, late of the Tenth Regiment Kansas Volunteers.

II. In taking leave the general commanding desires to express his gratitude to these officers for their valuable services and uniform gallant conduct.

III. Company E, Fourteenth Kansas Volunteers, under command of Lieutenant W. B. Clark, detailed as escort to the commanding general on the 22nd of October, are deserving of special mention for their gallantry in the battles of the 23rd and 28th. They will inscribe on their guidon "Westport" and "Newtonia."

By command of Major-General Blunt:

GEO. S. HAMPTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UPPER ARKANSAS,

Fort Riley, Kans., November 22, 1864.

COMMANDING OFFICER,

Fort Larned, Kans.:

SIR: Information having reached these headquarters through unofficial sources of an attack made by Indians upon a corn train near your post, the major commanding directs that you furnish these headquarters with all the information that you possess of the affair; what steps you have taken to punish the perpetrators and your success. He also wishes in all similar instances to receive the first information of any movements of the Indians in this district, and this information should come from his officers and not from citizens. It is not necessary to use special messengers, except on extraordinary occasions. The coach and the mail afford ample facilities for communicating with the headquarters of your district, and you should not allow a single mail to pass by without communicating to headquarters any events of interest or that may prove beneficial to the interest of the service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. TAPPAN,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.