War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0599 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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eight dismounted men in eleven companies. General condition good; many are temporarily unserviceable; all need rest. The Seventh is now en route for Saint Louis.

JNO. F. PHILIPS,

Colonel, Commanding District.

JEFFERSON CITY, November 17, 1864.

Colonel JOHN F. PHILIPS:

Twenty-five guerrillas were in the vicinity of California, six miles southwest, last night.

S. H. MELCHER,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI,

Springfield, Mo., November 17, 1864.

Lieutenant H. H. ROGERS,

Assistant Provost-Marshal, Dist. of Southwest Missouri:

LIEUTENANT: It has been reported to these headquarters that there are several Federal soldiers in the stockade at this post who were captured by the rebels, and have escaped or been released on parole. The general commanding directs that you at once examine into this matter. If there are Federal soldiers in confinement as represented they will be released at once, unless they are suspected of having joined the rebel army. When released they will report to these headquarters for transportation to their respective commands.

Very respectfully,

WM. T. KITTREDGE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHWEST,

Milwaukee, Wis., November 17, 1864.

General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff of the Army:

GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit inclosed copy of a letter* from Captain Pell, General Sully's adjutant-general, who was left at Fort Sully, on the Upper Missouri River, to meet and confer with the chiefs of the tribes of hostile Sioux, who have sent word that they wished to come in and make peace. You will perceive from this report that the whole of the Sioux tribes south and west of the Missouri River, who constituted the mass of the hostile Indians who fought General Sully, are completely subdued and willing to make peace on almost any terms. I shall approve of the statements and arrangements recommended by General Sully, except in regard to presents to the Indians and a renewal of their annuities. The latter they have forfeited by the act of war, and the former I have always been opposed to in Indian treaties. A treaty of peace will be made with these Indians on the sole understanding that they do not commit acts

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*Not found.

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