War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0550 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY,

DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, Numbers 151.

New Orleans, November 13, 1864.

I. The camp of instruction for the cavalry of this department will be removed from Greenville and established at Kenner, La.

II. The camp will be laid out under the direction of Colonel O. P. Gooding, of the Thirty-first Massachusetts Mounted Infantry, who will, without delay, carefully inspect the position and submit to these headquarters the plan for the camp, depot, and stables.

III. The men will be hutted, and the necessary means for hutting them will be furnished by Captain C. B. Chittenden, assistant quartermaster cavalry forces, Department of the Gulf, including means of transportation, working tools, &c. He will take possession of such buildings as are subject to military control for his use as store-rooms, stables, &c., and see that secure corrals and yards are without delay constructed for the safe-keeping of all public animals.

IV. Colonel C. Everett, of the Second Louisiana Volunteer Mounted Infantry, is assigned to the command of this camp of instruction, and will proceed at once to hutting his men and organizing his command, and he will be expected to enforce the strictest system of economy, and to establish an administration that will insure the best order and highest discipline.

By order of Brigadier General B. S. Roberts, chief of cavalry:

H. C. SEYMOUR,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Port Hudson, La., November 13, 1864.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF:

SIR: I send you Martin Guillory, according to his account a leader of an independent company fighting against the rebels. He wants arms, ammunition, &c., I have declined furnishing him with anything whatever without orders from department headquarters. He may be able to give some information that will be of service respecting the rebels and their movements in Western Louisiana. He states that he is recently from Opelousas, La., with some twenty of his band, who are now just opposite this post, as he reports, in a destitute condition. He came into this post yesterday p. m. He was employed by me when chief of staff to General Banks, on the expedition to Alexandria in April and May, 1863, on secret service. He was not successful in attaining the desired object, whether from want of good will or want of ability, I was unable to determine. He was, however, paid for his services. I do not know enough of him to be able to say whether he is trustworthy or Numbers He is sent to new Orleans under guard to be turned over to you for action in his case.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. L. ANDREWS,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Numbers 29.

Fayetteville, Ark., November 13, 1864.

Soldiers, to-day you have assembled around the altar of God and your country, rejoicing int he blessings of life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness, purchased by the blood of your forefathers, heralded