War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0496 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE BORDER,

Camp Arkansas, November 8, 1864.

Major-General HALLECK:

We fired a parting salute on Price's rear guard as it crossed the Arkansas. He left another of his cannon, and scattered horses, wagons, and small-arms throughout his retreat from the Missouri to the Arkansas. He carried nothing of consequence away but 30,000 or 40,000 disorganized, half-naked, frightened wretches, who have been whipped in many conflicts for the past ten days. Fled in such haste, before less than 3,000 as to leave on his way our garrisons and supplies at Cassville Fayetteville, Fort Gibson, and Fort Smith safe from his starving hordes.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE BORDER,

Camp Arkansas, November 8, 1864.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Saint Louis:

We have just concluded the pursuit of Price, whose rear crossed the Arkansas under fire of our guns. He left another of his guns and his own carriage, which, with other arms and equipments, have fallen in our hands. We are rid of 20,000 or 30,000 half starved bushwhackers and brutish vagabonds, whom I hope may never return to disturb the peaceable inhabitants north of the Arkansas River. He is also beyond our posts at Fayetteville, Fort Smith, and Fort Gibson, which are now safe.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

(Same to General Davies).

[November 8, 1864.-For Curtis' and Blunt's congratulatory orders, see Part I, pp. 517 and 579, respectively.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO,

Santa Fe, N. Mex., November 8, 1864.

MICHAEL STECK, Esq.,

Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Santa Fe, N. Mex.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 5th instant, and to say in reply that it has hitherto seemed to be my duty, when Indians murdered our people and ran off their stock, to punish the aggressors if I could. The responsibility of all the consequences which may follow my acts it is expected will rest where it rightly belongs-that is to say, upon myself. I was not aware until so informed by yourself that it was expected that investigations with reference to Indian hostilities on our people were to be made through your office before a blow could be struck. It is, however, acknowledged that you should be informed when hostile demonstrations are to be made against Indians within your superintendency, and there-fore copies of orders in such cases have been sent to you. Utes and Apaches have and authority to go against the Kiowas and Comanches