War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0437 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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[Inclosure.]

LITTLE ROCK, ARK., November 5, 1864.

Brigadier-General THAYER,

Fort Smith, Ark.:

Official account of General Pleasonton's victory over General Price at the crossing of the Osage is as follows:

Price has one gun left, without ammunition, and his forces, demoralized and deserting, are escaping to Arkansas and Texas. You will use your cavalry to the best advantage in picking up stragglers, and if you can take any other advantage of Price's scattered forces do so.

I have just received the above from Major-General Steele, who is at Devall's Bluff.

E. A. CARR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS, No. 120. Vicksburg, Miss., November 5, 1864.

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II. The following order, which for some unknown reason has been disregarded during the past season, is now reiterated and will be strictly enforced:

SPECIAL ORDERS,

NATCHEZ, MISS., November 5, 1864.

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All the property in the Palmyra Bend, Miss., except the Turner and Quitman plantations, is hereby reserved for military purposes, on which will be established a home farm, and to furnish land for freedmen for their own cultivation. The general superintendent of freedmen will have entire control under the proper military authorities.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

The exceptions made in the order will no longer be regarded, and the whole peninsula known as Davis' Bend, including the three islands known as Hurricane, Palmyra, and Big Black, is reserved for military purposes, and will be the colonization, residence, and support of freedmen. The limits described will easily support not less than 25,000 of that class, who are now more or less dependent on the Government; and as the place is garrisoned and defended with that intention it will no longer be suffered to be sued for private profit whilst destitute colonel people are wandering as vagrants through the streets of towns, are huddled in localities exposed to inroads from the enemy, and are fed on Government rations. Davis' Bend is perfectly secured against attack and rebel raids; it is the natural home of the destitute and needy contraband, where his labor will be easily and richly rewarded under sure protection. It was never intended that his security should be afforded at a high cost to the Government under pretense of providing a "freedman's home" in order that three of four fortunate persons should be favored with leases of plantations in so desirable a locality. The home of Jefferson Davis is a suitable place to furnish the means of support and security for the unfortunate race he is being so instrumental in oppressing. All white person not connected with the military service will be required to leave the above limits before the 1st day of January,