War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0417 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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U. S. IRONCLAD ESSEX,

Memphis, Tenn., November 3, 1864.

Major General C. C. WASHBURN,

Commanding District of West Tennessee:

DEAR GENERAL: I am very much pleased to hear of your return. I did not know it until you had gone ashore. I am sorry you did not stop and see me for a moment, as you passed across the Essex. I beg leave to send you a copy of a communication just received from Captain Pennock, who was commanding the squadron when it was written. I also send a copy of Admiral Porter's General Orders, No. 121, referred to in Captain Pennock's letter. It is undoubtedly very essential just at this time that extra precautions should be taken against the surprise and capture of merchant steamers.

Trusting that you had a pleasant though but flying visit home, I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT TOWNSEND,

Commander, U. S. Navy.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON, FLAG-SHIP BLACK HAWK,

Mound City, Ill., October 31, 1864.

Commander ROBERT TOWNSEND,

Commanding U. S. Steamer Essex, Memphis:

SIR: * * * I inclose you Admiral Porter's Order, No. 121, which you will please have strictly carried out. The enemy are desirous of capturing a boat to enable them to cross the river, and will use all means to obtain this end, if they are to succeed in getting one which would only transfer a handful of men at a time. You will therefore perceive the necessity of preventing any boats landing at any point, above or below Memphis, except at military posts, or under such protection as a gun-boat gives when her guns cover the entire landing and its approaches.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. PENNOCK,

Captain, U. S. Navy, Commanding Mississippi Squadron.

[Sub-inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS,

U. S. MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON, FLAG-SHIP BLACK HAWK, No. 121. Cairo, Ill., November 12, 1863.

Owing to disobedience of orders on the part of Acting Master Lyman Bartholomew, of U. S. steamer Eastport, in permitting a steamer to land when not under his guns and protection, and then paying her a visit in a boat with a small crew, the steamer Allen Collyer was destroyed by guerrillas and Mr. Bartholomew taken prisoner. This is to notify all persons belonging to this squadron that no steamer will under any circumstances be allowed to land at any point on the Mississippi River, except at a military post or which a gun-boat close along side of her, and in such a position that the guns of the gun-boat will completely command the levee.

DAVID D. PORTER,

Rear-Admiral, Commanding Mississippi Squadron.

27 R R-VOL XLI, PT IV