War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0349 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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Louis.on reaching the Missouri River means of crossing will be supplied at Boonville and arrow Rock. After crossing the whole division will march by the nearest practicable route through Columbia to saint Charles and there await further orders. Requisitions for everything needed for the command for another campaign in the field will be sent at once to these headquarters, so that they can be filled in time to reach the troops at Saint Charles. An official list of absentees now in the Department of the missouri, with the place at which they now are, will be sent in to these headquarters as soon as practicable. All surplus ammunition will be sent to Saint Louis via Jefferson City to be loaded on transports there. All wagons belonging to the Department of the Missouri not require for this movement will be sent to Jefferson City, and all other wagons belonging to this department will be turned over at Saint Charles, Mo.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOUGH,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS RIGHT WING, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Pleasant Hill, Mo., October 31, 1864 - 3 a. m.

Colonel DAVID MOORE,

Commanding Third division, Sixteenth Army Corps:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs that when your command leaves its present camp at Pleasant Hill it move in three columns, carrying three days' rations in haversacks and forty rounds of ammunition in their cartridge-boxes, and move as follows:

First day: First column, due north from Pleasant Hill to the warrensburg and Independence road. Third column, with wagons and batteries via Lone Jack, and on road two miles west of Chapel hill, to camp near Snibar Post-Office on Independence road. Wagons enough to carry 15,000 rations for troops and 15,000 rations to be left at Lexington will go with this column. Second column, via Lone Jack to Big Snibar River and down the river to Snibar and Independence road.

Second day: First column, march across prairie to head of Fire Creek and commence scouting down creek. Second Column, on road to Napoleon City, then down by Snibar River to camp about five miles from Wellington. Third column, to Lexington. Leave at Lexington three days' rations for first and second columns, and turn over 15,000 rations to commissary of post, retaining the wagons with this command.

Third day: First column, will rejoin the advance column without delay, passing through Lexington for three days' rations. Second column, join the advance column without delay, drawing three days' rations at Lexington. Third column, to Dover, scouting the river below.

The division will march to pinnacles the fourth day, to reach Glasgow on the fifth day, where boats and rations will await them. At the end of the first day's march one regiment will be detached from the first column to proceed as rapidly as possible to Independence Landing, where a boat will await them. This regiment will embark on boat and proceed down the river and capture the Boonville ferry-boat, now in the hands of the rebels somewhere on the river, and proceed with it and the boat they are on to Glasgow. Should [the boat] not be at Independence Landing when they arrived there let the regiment rejoin its command without delay. In the movement of columns a