War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0311 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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telegram, as well as to several others, I can get no answer. I respectfully add in regard to this militia that the retention of the whole of it in the service is, in my opinion, a positive injury to the Government as well as a large expense. There are 4,000 or 5,000 of them, how many cannot be positively ascertained, because they cannot coaxed or driven to make a return sufficiently near correct to enable me to guess at their strength. Nearly half of them have deserted and are a scourge to the country. I beg the privilege of dispensing with all but two regiments, which will remain in for thirty days if the general commanding directs, and will be worth more to the Government than the whole division of stragglers. If the general commanding does not see fit to answer the application in this and in my former telegrams, I respectfully request at least an acknowledgment of the receipt.

THOMAS EWING, JR.,

Brigadier-General.

WARRENSBURG, October 29, 1864.

Brigadier-General EWING,

Saint Louis:

Report the militia you deem no longer necessary and they will be ordered mustered out. B a little more courteous in your future communications, remembering that you have not all things before your mind, and if you had, are not authorized to reprimand your commanding general's staff officers for supposed neglect of your communications.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, October 29, 1864 - 5.45 p. m.

Colonel J. V. DU BOIS,

Chief of Staff:

I beg pardon for the very discourteous tone of mu dispatch of this morning, which was unintentional and at which I feel mortified. I wrote it in great haste and did not read it over, nor appreciate that the language was such as justly to give you and the general offense. Please show this to him. I will at once send the names of the regiments I wish mustered out.

THOS. EWING, JR.,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, October 29, 1864.

Major MONTGOMERY,

Sixth Missouri Cavalry, Wentzville, Mo.:

A large rebel force is reported to have thrown a train off the track five miles beyond Warrenton, and to have been fighting the escort at last accounts. You will march forthwith to Warrenton and thence to the scene of the action, unless your information leads you to think other movements more advisable. I ordered up re-enforcements from Saint Charles if they can send any, and also from perruque bridge.

THOMAS EWING, JR.,

Brigadier-General.