War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0302 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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NEWTONIA, MO., October 28, 1864 - 8 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

We came up to the enemy at this place this evening, and General Blunt, in advance, immediately engaged him. General Sanborn, with his command, soon joined the advance, and the rebels were again routed with heavy loss. They now run toward Cassville, where I shall continue after three hour's rest.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH BRIGADE, CAVALRY DIVISION,

Cow Creek, Jasper County, Mo., October 28, 1864.

Major General S. R. CURTIS,

Commanding Department:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I am en route to join your command, and will camp in the vicinity of Carthage to-night, seeking forage, which I had to do without last night. My horses are very much jaded. I left Fort Scott on the 27th instant, 10 a. m., and have been pushing on as speedily as possible. I met a great many stragglers coming back from your command, who all agree in relating that you have discontinued the pursuit, Price being out of striking distance. The march through Arkansas made by my command, added to the pursuit through this State, has nearly dismounted it. If it is not necessary to follow, oblige by sending courier back with such orders. Till I get such orders I will push on to you with all the speed possible.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. BENTEEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

CAMP ON COON CREEK,

Fifty-one Miles Southeast of Fort Scott, October 28, 1864.

General DAVIES:

I am sending forward prisoners to Fort Leavenworth, where I want them cared for. Direct the quartermaster to fix up a suite of barracks. I suppose the new barracks will have to be appropriated, the high fence being convenient for the purpose.

CURTIS,

Major-General.

FORT SCOTT, October 28, 1864.

General DAVIES;

Four o'clock yesterday I left Lamar, our army well closed up. Price moving on Bowers' Mills ahead of ours, and Blunt pushing and will pursue to Arkansas River with force enough to crush him. Every step taken gives evidence that Price's army is demoralized and starving.

J. H. LANE.