War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0184 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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sabering many of the enemy. McNeil and Sanborn are still running them toward Westport. I can hear Blunt's guns toward Kansas City. I shall push on the fast as possible. A scout reports Price intrenched this side of the Big Blue. The capture guns are ready for use. There is no doubt that Price's whole force is here. Fighting still going on within on obstinate rear guard. Let Smith come to this place.

Very respectfully,

A. PLEASONTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

LEXINGTON, MO., October 22, 1864-8 p. m.

Major-General PLEASONTON,

Commanding Cavalry Division, beyond Little Blue River:

Your dispatches of 12.45 and 1.45 p. m. received duly, as were the two preceding. You are so near Independence that I am sure Price will go out of Jackson County into Kansas to-night. General Smith will be at Chapel Hill and will to-morrow move to Pleasant Hill. Yo are doubtless exercised your best judgment, but I still think to have threatened at that Little Blue and the have moved scout with the remained of your command to the Independence and Warrensburg road would have been better. By placing you near the enemy's line of retreat Price's retreat would then have been a necessity and with the infantry south of you and always behind you could have swung around is safety. As it is now you could have swung around in safety. As it is now you must be left to conform your movements to those of the enemy, having in view your supporting force of infantry as well as you union with Blunt's forces and the position of your depot of supplies at Warrensburg. I am well satisfied that Price will enter Kansas as soon as practicable. Should be leave to-night, as I judge he will, open communication with Smith by Lone Jack. I suggest pushing Winslow's cavalry forward, giving him a regiment of Missouri State Militia or Kansas, which knows the country. I have remained here on purpose to learn your movements. As the courier line is well established I expect to hear from you before morning, when I will leave to join Smith.

Yours,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION, Advance on Big Blue, October, 22, 1864-8 p. m.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Commanding Department of the Missouri, Lexington:

GENERAL: The enemy have been resisting my advance very stubbornly. We have fought them from Little Blue; they are fighting to get off their trains and are very strong in their rear guard. I have had all my brigades engaged. Winslow is now in at the Blue and the firing is brisk. The enemy have left at least 40 killed in our hands to-day besides a larger number of sick and wounded at Independence. The sides a large of sick and wounded at Independence. The colonel commanding the rear guard was wounded to-day and fell into our hands. Winslow reports a number of wounded in front. Have heard nothing from General Curtis' forces. General Suborn saw four