War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0142 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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SEDALIA, October 20, 1864-5.40 a. m.

Major-General CURTIS:

Your dispatch of 4.30 a. m. received. I will push my forces on Lexington with all possible speed.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

INDEPENDENCE, MO., October 20, 1864.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Sedalia, Mo.:

Dispatch received. I must confront Price, checking his progress as best I can, till he develops a movement southward. Your forces should come down on him by forced marches. Mine are not available for advanced positions till it is clear the enemy turns on you.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

INDEPENDENCE, MO., October 20, 1864-9 p. m.

General ROSECRANS:

Price's forces not seen to-day by my scouts or picket ten to fifteen miles forward. Think Price must be near Lexington to-day. Blunt held his advance about three hours. He threw only round shot, and seemed to be saving of this. Nothing important this way.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

INDEPENDENCE, MO., October 20, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS,

Commanding Department of Kansas:

I have the honor to submit that great dissatisfaction exists amongst the Kansas Militia from the fact that martial law has been declared in their own State and all business suspended, while in Missouri, where the actual danger for which they are called into service exists, no such restrictions prevail. In Kansas City, Westport, and Independence they find the stores open and the citizens engaged in the pursuit of their usual occupations. Inasmuch as all the objects for which martial law was declared in Kansas have been accomplished, and the services of the entire militia secured, I would respectfully ask that the order establishing martial law in Kansas may now be revoked.

THO. CARNEY,

Governor.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE BORDER,

Camp near Independence, October 20, 1864.

Respectfully referred to Colonel Coates, commanding officer, Kansas City, who will see that the proclamation declaring martial law in the State of Kansas and the country occupied by the troops moving therefrom is enforced by the closing of business houses in Kansas City and places adjacent which are now so occupied.

By command of Major-General Curtis:

C. S. CHARLOT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.