War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0141 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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troops gave a few blows at the enemy and fell back in good order. Our loss, killed and missing, about 50. All reports put Price's force at 20,000.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

INDEPENDENCE, October 20, 1864-3 a. m.

General ROSECRANS:

General Blunt informs me by messenger that he has been attacked and overpowered at Lexington, and is falling back on this place.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

SEDALIA, October 20, 1864-4 a. m.

Major-General CURTIS:

Blunt should hold Wellington and develop their force, at farthest the forks of the roads south of Napoleon City. So soon as we find they are moving toward Lexington from Waverly with their main force, we shall endeavor to strike them by a forced march. My infantry will be in Brownsville to-day. The cavalry are in front of that position extending from the direct Lexington road northeast. If Blunt has been driven by a single division the enemy may yet attempt to retreat by Shelby's old route, near Syracuse, but I believe it will yet be found to be the advance of Price's entire force preparing to move south by Warrensburg. In either case I think it best for you to move from Independence to the Big Snibar road, which would support Blunt and enable you to move on the enemy's flank by Lone Jack Or Chapel Hill. Advise me what you think.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE BORDER,

Camp near Independence, October 20, 11864-4.30 a. m.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Sedalia:

I have just received the following important dispatches:

WELLINGTON, October 19, 1864-7 p. m.

General CURTIS:

Price advanced on Lexington in two columns and drove in my pickets about 2 p. m. I advanced my line, skirmishing with them until their whole force was developed, and they commenced to flank me on the right and left, when I fell back on the Independence road. They pressed us hard, but we made our retreat, losing but few men. I shall move unceasingly to-night until I find a good position and am in supporting distance of you. It is certain that Price's whole force is in Lexington, and is not less than 20,000. Their artillery did us no damage, while ours was used with good effect. I will communicate with you often.

JAS. G. BLUNT.

Blunt is now within eight miles of this place, resting. I will probably prepare to make a stand on Big Blue, five miles west.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.