War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0095 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

scarce of provisions you better move via Westport so as to be near the supply depot at Kansas City. The distance is greater, but you must have provisions. Deitzler is now at Independence asking for provisions.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

CAMP CHARLOT, October 18, 1864.

Captain RUGGLES:

Send 10,000 rations as quickly as possible to General Deitzler, at Independence. Turn them over to Colonel Ford's quartermaster at that place.

By command of Major-General Curtis:

C. S. CHARLOT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE BORDER,

Camp Charlot, October 18, 1864.

Major-General DEITZLER,

Independence:

You must see to having your commissaries attend to provisions. That is always the first thing I urge on my officers, knowing it is too often delayed. The post commissaries at Leavenworth and Kansas City are trying to fill requisitions, but they must be greatly embarrassed. Local commissaries must pick up provisions by the way. I am told your troops as Shawnee had no coffee. Surely some regimental or division quartermaster must be at fault. I have news of the rebels taking Harding's little force at Glasgow on the 15th. I hope now telegraphic lines are open and operators ready to communicate between us.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

CAMP CHARLOT, October 18, 1864.

General DEITZLER,

Independence:

I have ordered 10,000 rations to be sent as soon as possible to Ford's assistant quartermaster; also ordered Blair's forces to move forward to re-enforce you. Have sent telegraph dispatch, which trust has reached you. Am very anxious to hear from Smith's scout. Give me every item of news and set your face and military power down on Carsburg about the rights of militia. They are under martial law and in the U. S. service. Send forward scouts from time to time. Smith may have been gobbled up. Send back dispatches to hurry troops forward. Price has evidently come to Lexington or thereabouts, and the episode against Harding, too, helps to confirm my convictions. Several dispatches from Rosecrans yesterday also persist in this idea. Price must move south or west, and Blunt's move shows he has not gone south yet.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.