War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0071 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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remained back at Jacinto and has since moved this way. I have loopholed all the houses along the bayou around the city and have made and inner line of cotton bales and hay.

Your obedient servant,

M. L. SMITH,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

[Sub-inclosure.]

FOURTEEN MILES BELOW WATERLOO,

October 12, 1864. (Received 13th.)

Brigadier General M. L. SMITH,

Memphis:

Look out for an attack from Forrest in heavy force, as he has been driven out of Middle Tennessee. Scout roads day and night thoroughly. Call in troops at White's Station.

C. C. WASHBURN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Mouth of White River, Ark., October 18, 1864.

Major General J. J. REYNOLDS,

Commanding Nineteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: General Dennis having gone to Little Rock, Ark., in company with Major-General Herron, I have taken the liberty of advising you of our movements since the date of his last communication. Pursuant to instructions from Major-General Steele, that portion of the First Brigade, Third Division, at this point was sent to Devall's Bluff on the 6th instant. Since that time the following-named troops have arrived from Morganza and Vicksburg: Twentieth and Twenty-third Iowa, Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and One hundred and twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry Volunteers. The three former regiments were sent up White River yesterday morning. Colonel Guppey's brigade, of this division, has also arrived from below, with the exception of the Twenty-eighth Illinois, which is expected to-day. The Eleventh Illinois Cavalry and L Company, Second Illinois Artillery, are also expected to-day and will be forwarded up White River as fast as transportation can be secured, should General Steele so desire. From Colonel Parsons, chief quartermaster, from Saint Louis, I learn that some four or five boats will be down the river to-day, consequently there will be ample transportation. Inclosed please find a copy of a letter received at 7 a. m. this day from General Smith, at Memphis, Tenn. The call being of an urgent nature, and requiring immediate action, I have sent one brigade to General Smith's support. The force now left at this point consists of Colonel Guppey's brigade (four regiments), three regiments of colored, troops, a small detachment of Eighty-seventh Illinois Mounted Infantry and Twenty-sixth New York Battery, from which we can readily re-enforce either General Steele or General Smith, as the exigency demands.

WM. E. KUHN,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.