War of the Rebellion: Serial 086 Page 0053 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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in your charge, you sending along teamsters and wagon-masters to operate them and report to Captain Seelye for duty till this campaign is over. When do teams start? Answer to Captain Seelye.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, October 17, 1864.

Major HUNT,

Kansas City:

I sent the section of the battery off at about 2 o'clock this morning. The 3-inch ammunition goes with Major Sam. Your corporal and six men just reported. I told you last night I did not want them. Will send them back in an hour.

JOHN WILLANS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KANSAS CITY, MO., October 17, 1864.

Captain WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fort Leavenworth, Kans.:

Ascertain if Ninth Wisconsin Battery, Captain Dodge, has passed through Lawrence en route to Paola. Have orders sent to them to move to Shawneetown, reporting there to General Deitzler, commanding Kansas State Militia, temporarily for duty. If beyond Lawrence have commanding officer send messenger to them with orders.

R. H. HUNT,

Major and Chief of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS,

Pleasant Hill, October 17, 1864--1.30 a. m.

Major-General CURTIS:

I arrived here one hour ago. Major Anderson had just arrived from Warrensburg. Captain Palmer, with twenty men, had been sen to Knobnoster (ten miles east of Warrensburg) before Major Anderson had to fall back. He has not yet been heard from. I send you statement of one of our spies who has been inside of Price's lines. The statement was furnished by him to Major Anderson, at Warrensburg, and the latter believes it reliable. Price is represented to have a force of 20,000, and is conscripting daily as well as receiving volunteer recruits. He has with him a drove of cattle and sheep. It is common rumor in Price's camp and among his friends that he is going to follow the river the Lexington and Kansas City; thence through Kansas and the Indian country to the Arkansas. I shall remain here until daylight, and then make a reconnaissance toward Warrensburg. I do not deem it prudent to move a large force on this road until the enemy's movements are more fully developed. I am inclined to the opinion that their main column will move by way of Lexington and Independence, and that our force should be concentrated as fast as possible at that place and Hickman Mills, within supporting distance of each other. Colonel Ford