War of the Rebellion: Serial 085 Page 0454 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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received have led me to believe. I am greatly pained at these reverses, and am straining every nerve to make reparation. Troops were never more active and earnest in their duties than the officers and men now seeking the destruction of the infernal fiends who are guilty of such barbarous atrocities. I am aware that it may seem to yourself and the impatient public remote from this section that we ought to accomplish more than we do; that the guerrillas ought to be exterminated from the country, and such disasters as those at Centralia prevented, but could you see this section of the State and study not only the topography of the country but the hearts and consciences of the people you would readily discover the great difficulties in the way of finding and exterminating bushwhackers. Jackman, with less than 100 men, remained in Boone County for fifteen months, waging his bushwhacking warfare, and during that period there were scarcely any other bushwhacking gangs in North Missouri. Yet General Guitar, who was born nd raised in Boone County, and knew every pathway and brush patch, with 6,000 good troops, was not able to drive out or kill him. Boone and Howard are now out two worst localities. In one of them I have General Douglass, who is a native of the county, has been its sheriff, and knows intimately the character of the country and the hearts of its citizens; and in Howard is Major Leonard, whose advantages for operating in his country are equal to those of General Douglass for Boone. In addition I have Lieutenant-Colonel Draper, who has scouted through both counties for two years. yet with all their knowledge, industry, and perseverance the guerrillas thus far scatter and concentrate so as to elude our forces. Our movements, through made as secretly as possible, are discovered by the bushwhackers' friends and revealed from one to another. The citizens at home are our secret and most dangerous foes, and in no spot of all our disturbed territory has the rebellion more earnest friends than in the Missouri River counties of this district. The invasion in the southeast strengthens our sympathizing class and they are made to believe that Price with "redemption draweth nigh." How shall these guilty people be brought to repentance and good works? We have in these counties not only the resident rebels, but in addition a large proportion of those who, by General Ewing's order, were last year expelled from Johnson, Jackson, and other border counties. Depopulation and devastation are extreme measures, but if this infernal warfare continues it will be humane and economic of human life to adopt and vigorously enforce such measures wherever the bushwhackers have more friends than the Government.

Still pledging my most earnest efforts in the restoration of peace, and hoping for success, I am, general, with great respect, your obedient servant,

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

GLASGOW, September 28, 1864.

Captain G. A. HOLLOWAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Joseph:

What force have we in the entire district, including militia on duty as per last report?

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.