War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0923 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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SAINT LOUISE, August 29, 1864.

Major-General PLEASONTON:

From the best information you can obtain what is your conclusion touching an invasion of the State from Arkansas by the rebels?

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

WARRENSBURG, August 29, 1864.

Brigadier General C. B. FISK,

Saint Louis:

Your dispatch received. There is no definite information of a raid by the rebels from Arkansas.

A. PLEASONTON,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DIST. OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, No. 51.

Warrensburg, Mo., August 29, 1864.

Commanding officers of sub-district, posts, or stations within this district,immediately on receipt of this order, will select and establish suitable encampments in the vicinity of the towns or villages at present occupied by troops, and under no circumstances will enlisted men be permitted to enter the towns without a pass from their company commander, approved by the commanding officer of the camp. The encampments will be selected with a special view to the health of the command, affording a sufficient supply of water and fuel,and proper protection of the towns. The district and assistant district inspector will report to these headquarters any violation of this order, and commanding officers will be held to a rigid accountability that the same is strictly complied with. Each commanding officer of a sub-district, post or station will forward direct to these headquarters a report stating the locality of the camp selected in accordance herewith.

By order of Major-General Pleasonton:

J. H. STEGER.

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS POST, Cassville, August 29, 1864.

Brigadier General J. B. SANBORN,

Commanding District of Southwest Missouri:

GENERAL: I herewith forward the report* of Captain Powell, Company F, Second Arkansas Cavalry Volunteers, and desire to add that I believe the accident would not have happened if the men had been kept out of the wagons and in the proper order and under arms while on the march. It appears that the men, having become sore-footed and tired, were allowed to put their arms in the feed-boxes, and were also allowed to get up and ride on the wagons and mules of the rain. This was the condition of things when the attack was made. Several stands of arms were lost in this way. I have not learned what number.

I have the honor to be, general, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

HUGH CAMERON,

Lieutenant Colonel Second Arkansas Cavalry, Commanding Post.

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*See Part I,p.273.

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