War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0844 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

AT CAMP, ONE MILE SOUTH OF RUSSELLVILLE,

August 23, 1864-7 a. m.

Colonel J. M. CHIVINGTON:

DEAR SIR: About 8 o'clock on the morning of the 21st three men were attacked by some fifteen Indians about three miles southwest of the California ranch. Two out of the three escaped, the other is missing yet. Scouts were immediately sent in search and found that the house had been robbed, but found no Indians. Had scouts out yesterday, the 22nd, also; we made no new discoveries. Some cattle came into California ranch yesterday evening with arrows sticking in them, which from appearances must have been shot the day previous. There are about thirty men at California ranch, most of which have been organized into a company. They have fortified in such a manner as that I think there is not much doubt that they can hold out against any band of Indians that is likely to come against them. Scouts leave for Running Creek this morning; will return this evening. I have been expecting Captain Cree's company for the last twenty-four hours, but has not arrived yet. We leave this morning and will camp on Squirrel Creek some twenty miles south of this. The names of the men that were run in by the Indians - L. Welty, George Ingle, and C. Marshall. The latter is the one that is missing. My scouts found his rifle and hat near the house that was robbed. The rifle was broken, the hat was full of arrow holes. There are some things which would lead to the belief that they were guerrillas, such as the breaking of the gun, robbing the house. They had smashed a brass clock to pieces, but had left without carrying off the brass wheels, and you are aware that Indians are fond of brass.

A. J. GILL,

Captain, Commanding Colorado Rangers.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLORADO TERRITORY,

Denver, August 24, 1864.

Colonel J. M. CHIVINGTON,

Commanding District of Colorado, Headquarters Denver:

SIR: I am directed by His Excellency Governor Evans to inclose for your information copy of a letter received from Captain S. E. Browne, dated Latham, August 24, 1864, your obedient servant,

D. A. CHEVER,

Private Secretary.

[Inclosure.]

LATHAM, August 24, 1864.

Honorable JOHN EVANS,

Governor and Commander-in-Chief:

I have the honor to report that I left Lupton yesterday at 7 a. m. with twenty-nine men on scout down the river, having heard that Indians had been seen at the mouth of Big Thompson, and that five were visible up that stream. We scouted the river bottoms and failed to find any fresh signs of Indians between that point and this. When we met the coach going up the river we were informed that Elbridge Gerry's stock had been stolen, and we pushed on with the command to this point, when we were met by scouts who had followed the thieves